Look at this ship's cook prepare a meal in heavy seas

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2019/11/07/look-at-this-ships-cook-prep.html

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Vaguely related:

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Here’s me editing during not so heavy seas (well, the Hudson river):

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Liberal 5-second-rule time.

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That man has sea legs. Did 5 years on tankers / freighters / other rust buckets as a Chief Cook, yep that’s the job.

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CLEARLY, this guy is more than just a ship’s cook, and some sort of nefarious villain.

Papasan the sailor man? Toot toot!?

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First thought was @Papasan: The Early Years :grinning:

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Chasing rolling juice glasses and cutlery was one of the many joys of being a wardroom mess crank. I’d set up a table for over 20 people and it would all slide off to the ground.

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When suppertime came, the old cook came on deck saying
Fellas, it’s too rough to feed ya

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When interviewing a cook, take the boat out to rough water, and ask him to make some BLTs.

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I tried to help him by rolling my phone while I was watching, but the plate still flew off the counter.

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What was your specialty?

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Rice and beans, corn bread so good that make yo mamma cry.

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It is actually amazing what you can get used to when at sea.

I have a strong and profound memory of going directly into heavy wind for about 12 hours (coming in to port) off the West coast of Vancouver Island on a trawler. I smoked a joint while standing just outside the back door of the wheelhouse. We would ride way up on one wave, then basically submarine through the next, and I would be utterly surrounded by a rushing tunnel of green water without getting a drop on myself. This repeated every 30 seconds or so for hours.

At first I was scared, then just in awe. It is a sad memory now because most of those guys died when that boat sank about a year later (when I had gone back to college).

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Sounds good.

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But what I’m really wondering is, did you ever have to sacrifice your stainless steel cutting utensils for an emergency appendectomy at the bottom of Tokyo Bay? :thinking:

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Interesting if it was eggs in the bowl …

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Hmmm; is it really heavy seas, or clever camera work?

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We need a Sisyphus award so you can win it.

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In Sydney, the inner-harbour ferries are small catamarans that stop running in severe weather. However, the Manly ferries are ocean-going ships equipped with radar, and keep running in anything short of a hurricane.

When I was a teenager, I used to wait for summer nights with bad weather, then sneak out of the house and ride the late Manly ferry just for the hell of it.

On the last section of the voyage, as the ferry crosses the Heads and turns north, it’s exposed to the full force of the Pacific Ocean. On a good night, the waves would break over the bow of the ship.

I used to sneak up to the bows Kate Winslet style, wrap myself in the anchor chains to keep from being washed away and just let the waves break over me.

It was grand.

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