Mad Max: Fury Road international trailer

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Hunh. Not much footage we haven’t seen before, but the contexts are all different with editing. And there are things in BLUE (ie, not in orange-red-brown). Well. That’s different.

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Really ready to see this.
I think that blue footage was in the last trailer. But this IS the first time I’ve seen the clip where someone’s fighting with what appears to be a double-necked, flame-spewing electric guitar. Let’s see the Avengers pull that off.

It’s basically a mashup/cut of these two:

Which I doubt are international, so yeah…

Also I’ve probably watched those trailers like a 100 times…
also this:

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Kudos to the money men who are letting George Miller helm this…

Are there any Black people in the future? Even a dystopian one, in Australia?

How about Aborigines?

Man, what is the carbon footprint of that trailer?

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I love that the kid from about a boy is getting so much work these days. Loved him in Skins, he looks awesome in this (“What a lovely day”), he’s Beast in the new X-Men movies, and to top it off he kicked butt going round the Top Gear track too. Not to mention a couple other interesting projects he has coming up soon too.

That depends on the quality of the render farm, now doesn’t it?

And efficiency, and size, and combined CPU-hours, yes.

Aboriginal/Indigenous Australians make up around 2% of the current Australian population, roughly the same as the portion of the U.S. population who are Native American/American Indian/Alaskan Native. I don’t recall if there were any American Indians in the last Hunger Games trailer.

Tragically, European settlers on both continents did a pretty thorough job with that whole “genocide” thing (both by intent and imported disease) and the effects are probably going to last at least a few more generations.

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So…that would be a ‘No, there are not.’ ?

Well, not many. At least not at the present.

Of course there’s also no rule that the demographics of dystopian-future-Australia have to reflect the demographics of present-day-Australia. Maybe Aboriginal Australians fared the apocalypse better than other ethnic groups because their population wasn’t concentrated in urban centers that were wiped out during World War III and they had more cultural experience surviving the harsh landscape of the outback. Or maybe lots of people immigrated to Australia after the apocalypse, like the clearly-American-born Auntie Entity from Mad Max: Beyond Thunderdome.

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I am nearly about as excited about this as the new Star Wars film. No, actually I am more excited, because this film doesn’t have to live up to any expectations. The sheer stunning visuals in the trailer and character design and revisiting our favorite post-apocalyptic anti-hero is enough.

Looks like they’ve resurrected the VW from “The Cars That Ate Paris.”

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I like to think they’re smart enough to go back to their old ways deep in the outback, and leave the white people to their violent selfish problems.

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I can’t speak for the Australian situation, but in the US, there are far more than 2% Native American. But most of them are not categorized as such. If you do a genetic sampling of people in the US, you will find that we are everywhere. Your average so-called “white”, “black”, or “hispanic” who’s family has been in the US for more than a few generations is in actuality largely native.

I’m not talking about people who have a tiny percentage Native American ancestry and little-to-no affiliation with Native American culture. I’m talking about people who actually identify as Native American/Alaskan Native/etc. as opposed to some other race. That number is still in the neighborhood of 2%.

In terms of Hollywood representation very few movies prominently feature characters who are clearly identifiable as Native American. When they do, those characters are often typecast as the stereotypical “wise sage who has a deep connection with nature” figure. Or if you go back a few decades the “noble savage” figure. Or maybe even just “savage.”

So it’s really not surprising that Aboriginal Australians are depicted in Australian films about the same way that Native Americans are depicted in American films.

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Peter really should remake that movie.