Man collides with door divider


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2017/06/30/man-collides-with-door-divider.html


#2

Embrace the pain…


#3

I actually was thinking that he got what he deserved. What kind of monster opens both doors and takes up the entire doorway?!

I bet he walks up and down the very center of the stairs too.

savage.


#4

I love the slow burn as he stands perfectly still and takes hold of the thing, trying to wish away how silly he feels.


#5

I think he is telling the frame to get out of his way.


#6

a bunch of escalator middle standers, the lot of em…


#7

That blond in the background is totally distracting. I blame it on her. /s


#8

In the architectural openings industry, that door divider is known as a “mullion”. The term also applies to windows.

When you have double doors and no fixed center anchor post aka mullion, it’s because one of the doors has a “floating mullion”, which may be secured into the midpoints of the frame’s header and sill to bar it into place.

Floating mullions are generally regarded as safer for evading fire (especially for windows) and entering (doors) with a flourish.


#9

There was a comment by an engineer in the local papers that standing on one side of the escalator causes uneven wear on the more loaded side.


#10

Any fool (who’s ever been to London) knows that you stand on the right of the escalator, leaving the left clear for those who want to walk up.

So the engineers should be designing the escalators to allow for the uneven loading that implies (unless they’re complete amateurs).


#11

From following hardware experts, a mullion between pairs of doors is much preferred to ensure easier locking of doors and reduced maintenance. The mullions can be removable to allow moving of large stuff. While not specifically proven, the evidence leans towards the mullion increasing the number of people who use the doors in an emergency. For more than you wanted to every know: http://idighardware.com/2016/11/is-this-an-urban-legend/


#12

It’s also easier to engineer in such a way that it constitutes a smoke barrier.


#13

Exectly the kind of thing I would do.


#14

I’m pretty sure that’s an astragal: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astragal, not a mullion. Both are great words, though, and the title of the article would be improved by using one or both.


#15

The astragal is the thing that you’d put on one door in a pair, if there were no mullion to seal against.

The loading dock door next to my office has such a thing…


#16

Except in Australia we stand on the left of the escalator. I suppose Australia an England could have escalator swaps to even out the wear


#17

He’s used to George W. Bush doors.

Door uniters not dividers.


#18

Somehow I imagine escalators are not made on spec and left on the shelves until a buyer arrives. No excuse and no swapsies needed unless the designers really are

One imagines they are built to order and the usage parameters known well in advance.

(But I’d totally want to be the guy whose job it is to arrange such Aussie-Brit escalator swapsies. What a business card! “The Anglo-Australian Escalator Exchange Society - Swapsies Programme Manager”)


#19

I would hope that escalator designers design them to handle the load caused by everyone standing at one side, since etiquette demands it. And it would be silly to design them to handle less load on the other side.


#20

On even numbered days…