Man paves road with unwashed clam shells, neighbors are sickened by stench


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2017/06/12/man-paves-road-with-unwashed-c.html


#2

Well, I’d think after a couple weeks the scavengers will eat all the remains and the sun ill kill the microbes on the surface. Might get better.


#3

From the looks of the news broadcast, it’s more like “neighbor” than “neighbors” – seems like one lady protesting. That said, who pours thousands of unwashed clamshells on a road?


#4

Yeah I am sure it will sort itself in a couple weeks.

The bigger likely issue is that claim shells are going to have sharp fragments. May puncture a tire?


#5

Sounds like the textbook entry for “dim-witted arsehole” just got a new illustration. Enjoy your 5 minutes of glory, David Rose – in the good ol’ U.S.A. that illustration is changed very often.


#6

This too – whole clam shells are spiky and very strong, and could totally puncture tires if run over. People use shells as paving all the time – CRUSHED shells. I’m sure he saved a few bucks by buying unwashed shells from a fishery and will now have to pay a whoooole lot more to clean it all up.


#7

Once the stink blows over it will be a very pretty road.
Near Point Reyes, there’s a driveway from Sir Francis Drake Blvd that is brilliant white from oyster shells. The oyster company is since gone, but road shines on.


#8

Crushed shells are a common driveway material in coastal RI, CT, Cape Cod, etc. But they’ve been crushed and tumbled, so that the sharp edges have been worn down.

The exception is after a clam bake, people often throw their shells on the driveway and let the tires crush them down over time. But this is a couple buckets of fresh shells, not hundreds of feet of clam shells piled 4 inches deep.


#9

Believe I’ll use my very first “Christ, what an asshole” here.


#10

This right here. Some co workers who are in KY just asked me when discussing this story “clam shells for a driveway?!” To which I said…YUP. very common up here in RI especially near the coast. Its a natural stone-like material that holds up well to the salt-water air. To your exact point they are normally processed: cleaned, sterilized, then tumbled. Much how stone is worked over for the same use elsewhere.


#11

Back in the day, they were used on Florida roads and highways, too. I used to love the look of it.


#12

The smell will be gone after a few weeks/months/definitely by next spring, it’s not really a big deal.


#13

bb is where I come for all my clam news.


#14

Welcome to bOINGbOING!


#15

15 posts in and still no innuendo.

I mean, um, there’s no reason for innuendo…


#16

Until all of those maggots blossom into a apocalyptic fly infestation. It was like a living carpet!


#17

You mean, like, “Are we sure she’s smelling the unwashed road clams?” Or something like that?


#18

RSS version of this story accompanied by GIF of writhing maggots. Thanks, Boing Boing.


#19

Hey now, I don’t always agree with the BB writers, but that’s a bit harsh.


#20

Standing among unwashed clams is a good spot for a fish taco.

Maybe have a sausage party.

Good thing I don’t know what kind of innuendo you mean.