MEAT (redux), or, HOW I LEARNED TO STOP WORRYING AND EMBRACE MEAT, MEATLESS DISHES, AND VINTAGE COOKBOOKS


#1

Continuing the discussion from Meat:

oh, poop:

#So, here we are, then.


#2

May I remind y’all of Mid-Century Menu?


#3

Flickr has a wealth of groups dedicated to vintage cookbooks:
Pictures of vintage cookbook covers and page illustrations, from wacky to wonderful. Pamphlets, menus and old cooking advertisements and ephemera are also welcome!!
	
	
	
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	Due to all the exciting changes at flickr regarding...


#4

That is fantastic. All my old books are cheap reprints. There is one that a friends parent had which I would love to find–it has recipes for elephant and camel. If memory serves the elephant recipe ‘feeds roughly 300’


#5

Lileks <3


#6

You know when you like someone because of what they do and then you hear them speak and you’re all “oh no…”; that. :wink:


#7

Sorry, what? Lost me there.


#8

Sorry, my attempts at humour fall flat, often. I was talking about the guy behind Lileks.
Still love the cookbooks tho.


#9

Guess I just don’t know the guy enough to get it. I do enjoy his now-practically-vintage itself blog on vintage weirdness.


#10

When he got popular everyone sent me his blog (and book) and I had mini tantrums cuz i’ve been collecting cookbooks for years before anyone had ever heard of him!

/pout

This is the best one I own, I actually use it most of all.


Quitting sugar "changed my brain"
#11

I am home sick today, so I just ran and took some snaps, this is incomplete, I have more… elsewhere. Hush, I don’t have a problem, you have a problem!


#12

I gave away my copies of “All American Ads of the 40s|50s” last year. Still ambivalent. I hadn’t looked at them in a while. BUT NOW I CAN’T.


I have an Esquire magazine drinks book. Lovely illustrations.


#13

Yeah, it was a present, the things people buy you when you have a hobby… :wink:
Its ok… but I like the actual books/booklets themselves.


#14

i have a copy of this, a breezy blend of historical information nd useful recipes–


#15

######This is a bit of old graffiti around me neighborhood, I’ve been looking for an excuse to share.


#16

The topic was closed after 24 hours? When does that ever happen?


#17

MEAT (redux)

Stock, Bouillon or demi-glace?


#18

I have an entire bookcase in the eating area of the kitchen for my cookbooks, so it’s hard to pick one favorite.

One that I used all the time when I was young, and probably should look for again, was called With a Jug of Wine. I’d have to adapt the recipes now, but I grew up making things like boeuf bourguignon and veal scallopine. If you find that cookbook, and you cook meat, BUY IT!!


#19

@SteampunkBanana, @awjt

(source)


#20

I love cookbooks so much! Such a fascinating look into history, into a people, a place, a period of time. So much going on! New ingredients! New technology! So much going on in cookbooks! Bananas were new to most Americans, they needed to know what to do with these strange new fruit! Frozen concentrated orange juice changing the face of breakfast forever! Its all so amazing!

I was reading a cookbook from the late 17th century (England) and it contained recipes for “Macaroni” and it is immediately apparent that the writer of the recipe think that “macaroni” was a bean. To prepare “macaroni” you soak it over night, boil until its soft, mash with butter and salt and serve as a side. And cookbooks from the new world with weird recipes trying to incorporate new world crops like “Indian Corn Meal”, amazing history. A history of humans is a history of food.