Mother renames her son to match her misspelled tattoo of his original name


#21

OK, I found out what I remember seeing:

ETA - Iceland and Denmark have actual approved names on a list.


#22

Kris Kelvin is the main character in Stanislaw Lem’s Solaris. Which is pretty fucking cool (ha!)


#23

I guess there are no Moon Units in Sweden…


#24

A guy in Minnesota tried to change his name to a number back in 1978, and it was denied. (I knew someone who had known the guy at the time, so I had heard of him. I thought just now that I’d see if I could find an old article about him, and funnily enough, someone just wrote about it again a few months ago—kind of a look back at local history, I guess.) He wanted to change it to “1069”— apparently “One Zero Six Nine” would have been allowed, but he wanted digits not words.


#25

My twin brother named one of his sons Kevin, but always calls him Kelvin.


#26

well, he’s only 5… Kelvin, so super cool.

But as he ages, he’s slowly becoming a warmer person (and more active as well!).


#27

Yup-yup.

imagehttps://images2.laweekly.com/imager/did-suge-knight-really-dangle-vanilla-ice/u/original/2466082/vanillaicefortop.jpg


#28

We have a winner, folks.


#29

Dude, chill!


#30

I wonder what age he’ll be when he googles his name and finds this story.

That’s a logical choice, assuming that the Swedish health care system doesn’t cover tattoo removal but does pay for therapy.


#31

Whit this name the kid will surely be emplyed by the famous Swedish home appliance manufacturer.


#32

good for you.

I on the other hand agree with the parents that Kelvin is a way cooler name than Kevin.


#33

I do, to a certain degree.


#34

You can, however, change your first name to a single letter. (Got a family friend named P.)


#35

Poor kid - out of the frying pan into the fire.

On the other hand:


#36

At some point they may have regerts


#37

I think they made the best decision.


#38

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