Mutant horticulture

I think it fits, so…

Allow David Cross GIF

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Not my yard/garden, this is along a local trail & I’m just wondering what it is. It looks a bit like what @dfaris posted 4 days ago, but that one hadn’t bloomed, yet - & now that I look again, this one has completely different leaves.

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I think mine is a viburnum. It has large glossy leaves. This is the first time it’s flowered, so I don’t know if this is its final form. I just moved it here from a one gallon pot that I had it in, and it seems to be really liking its new home.


It came as a short twig in a mail order package and I’ve been nurturing it along for two summers.

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This is a guess, but maybe Paprika Yarrow? Or some kind of red yarrow?

I was this many days old when I learned yarrow comes in colors other than yellow

https://www.missouribotanicalgarden.org/PlantFinder/PlantFinderDetails.aspx?taxonid=241837&isprofile=1&basic=Achillea

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Thank you for that! Good to know that it’s deer-tolerant. But as I live in front of the woods, and this spreads easily, I’m thinking I shouldn’t put any in my yard as there’s enough invasive stuff back there already

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I have pink yarrow in my yard. Not blooming yet though.

Agree with you that @Gyrofrog ’s photo is of yarrow.

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Yeah, it’s a pity that it’s invasive where you are. Maybe you’ll be able to find something either native or adapted that you like just as much. I actually love morning glories. But I also rip them out ruthlessly because they are very invasive where we are. I settled on a coral honeysuckle for a vine where I wanted it instead. Different than morning glory but it’s native, good for our wildlife, pretty, and doesn’t try to dominate my yard.

Now, if I could just get neighbors to do the same. Or t least stop cutting their oak trees in the middle of oak wilt season

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All of our oaks are gone. We started with four 60+’ white oaks. We hired the best service to maintain them. One by one, over the course of 10 years, down they came. The neighbors on one side cut all of theirs down at once. The neighbors on the other side had at least 6 big giants, but now they’re coming down because of freak wind storms, causing thousands of dollars in fence damage. :weary:

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More of the poppies have opened



They look a bit sad because it’s been raining a lot…

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Some are already beginning the first stage of metamorphosis:

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I’ve heard of corn mazes, but a “lilac labyrinth” is a new idea to me and sounds extra-lovely. (Except for my allergies, but I think I would put up with them, just to experience the heady fragrance and the sense of—I imagine—being transported to a kind of wonderland.)

(gift link)

COLD SPRING, Minn. — Thin branches — bowing at the weight of lush purple flowers — stretch over 12 feet high in Mike Nistler’s “lilac labyrinth.”

…maze of lilac plants — about 1,000 feet long with a winding pathway and several benches…

The couple’s 6.5-acre property, which is surrounded by sprawling farm fields, included scrubby trees when they moved there. But Mike had a vision for something more. So he planted hundreds of lilac bushes and spent a month laying down mulch — just to learn it wasn’t very effective against weeds. So he then spent a month removing the mulch and adding sand to the path. He now spends about 100 hours each year tending to the lilacs.

“I just thought, ‘I’m working so hard on this thing. I might as well let people enjoy it,’” he said.

It’s free, but Nistler collects donations for someone needing help.

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