Nearly 200 Mexicans stranded at Madrid airport for days


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2016/08/05/nearly-200-mexicans-stranded-a.html


#2

Seriously?

These peopleThe airline should have historical data which tells them how full they expect flights to be.

If all of the flights to a destination are 95+% full for a two-week period, you should not be selling stand-by tickets to/from that destination!

*Edited for clarity


#3

So…are you victim blaming, here? or complaining about the obvious corruption?


#4

I’m saying “The airline should have known, based on previous years, that these flights would be too full to carry the number of people they sold tickets to,” and “Given that information, the airline shouldn’t have sold these tickets in the first place.”

I don’t see how either of those things would be victim blaming.


#5

your first sentence could be read different. I had to read the COMPLETE comment to get your intention ; )


#6

Ah, gotcha. Fixed.


#7

Won’t somebody think of the poor airlines?


#8

No Problem. I’m going to … because as I read it they’re not victims.

From the article:

They have Aeromexico budget tickets, issued to airline staff and their relatives, which enable them to fly only if seats become available.
The airline says it advised ticket-holders not to fly during the peak holiday season.

So they got cheap tickets, possibly well in advance, and because they’re cheapskates they flew despite the warning. No sympathy from me then …


#9

I’ve made some poor choices in my life to save money for entertainment purposes.

So I’m setting up a GoFundMe page.


#10

Hey, I’m a poor self-control me too, can I get some of that?


#11

Sure, but doesn’t the punishment in this case outstrip the crime?


#12

U.S. presidential candidate Donald Trump has contacted Madrid authorities and urged them to build a wall - albeit a very high wall - around the airport to prevent the Mexicans from getting out.


#13

“The airline says it advised ticket-holders not to fly during the peak holiday season.” = yeah, sure you did.

Anyway, I’m absolutely certain some local Catholic church will come 'round with a bus to take these good, weary travelers back to the sanctuary for shelter and respite. </'casm>


#14

Aeromexico is…less than inspiring…when it comes to flight scheduling and demand forecasting.

The one time I had the pleasure of their hospitality, they had used the expected cancellation rates from their regular flights for christmas holiday service. They helpfully solved the ensuing obvious problem by promising bumped passengers room on the subsequent flight, which was also overbooked for the exact same reason, and then bumping them again. I think it took us 4 cycles of that to actually get a flight, and I think that they pushed us ahead of some other luckless bastards because my dad was familiar with DOT denied boarding compensation requirements and willing to push the issue a lot harder than some mostly-useless ‘vouchers’.

I just hope that they outsource their aircraft maintenance; because the user-facing operation is a disaster.


#15

Yeah, the article says:

Several passengers sent a group letter to the Mexican consul in Madrid requesting help, but embassy sources said they could not resolve “a recurring problem with this company [Aeromexico]”.

I’m not surprised that their normal fare-paying passengers are getting caught with this, too, if it’s a known “recurring problem.”


#16

In one perspective, the “punishment” in this case is “An extra week more than you’d planned in the Costa Del Sol”.

I’ve flown budget, stand-by, and camped out for three nights straight in Heathrow, or under docks in Pireus before now. I got what I paid for. shrug


#17

Don’t tell Drumpf. If he hears of this he will want to build airports in Spain and make…someone?, pay for it?

Maybe the EU?


#18

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