Neoconservative's analysis: Donald Trump, elites, and the GOP's future


#1

[Read the post]


#2

This is the same David Frum, author of “the axis of evil” --who was a main supporter and advocate for the Iraq War.

Why does anyone listen to a warhawk, warmongering and former George W. Bush speech writer, who’s war advocacy cost the lost of life of thousands of U.S. soldiers and ten’s of thousands of Iraqi civilians.

This is the same David Frum who’s advocacy for the Iraq War has led the rise of the terrorist organization Daesh.


#3

However, if his analysis is as reported, he gets some things right.


#4

Because as a GOP insider, he’s well placed to offer analysis of how the GOP works (or doesn’t).

You don’t have to like the man.


#5

It is not about liking or disliking Frum, or me needing any inside analysis from him, that may be informative to others like you–thats fine.

He is a big part of what is wrong with the warmongering GOP.

No one who is aware needs any insider information on the motives of Richard Perle, Paul Wolfowitz, Dick Cheney, John Bolton and David Frum etc…

We did not have to go to war with Iraq for oil and as a part of remaking the Middle East–and we don’t need to remake the Middle East and world by going to war with Iran, Syria, Cuba, North Korea, African countries or whoever else extreme neocon warmongers designate.

Let them send their children and relatives off to die, but that will never happen, because all of the neocon warmongers dodged the draft and refused to fight when their tme to serve was present.


#6

There is another option. They splinter off a sizable chunk into third party.

A girl can dream…


#7

Especially since that would give the democrats the opportunity to do the same thing.


#8

Contemporary… politics are largely a process in which 1% kingmakers ram through their favorite candidate – who is inevitably hostile to the interests of the majority of voters – and then try to terrify their base about the awfulness of the other party’s candidate…

Sounds like you’re saying both parties are exactly the same and there’s no point in voting. But only one party wants you to stay home on election day. One party is trying to increase voter turnout, while one is using every desperate and illegal trick to suppress the vote. They don’t sound the same to me.


#9

Yeah, the Founding Fathers didn’t get everything right, did they?

The only way we can break out of the two-party system is for them to splinter, which automatically favors whoever DOESN’T splinter.

I could do a lot of good with a fraction of the resources dedicated to a system that’s never going to work. How much money is donated to each party in order to prevent the other from winning?


#10

Ugh, quit propagating the same stupid echo chamber politics that keep people like Trump and Cruz going strong. Frum is a realist, a member of the Loyal Opposition, and is at least fundamentally rational. To simply dismiss all of his ideas in their entirety because he was a realpolitik warhawk is both irrational and self-defeating.

All you have to do is read his words with a clear dispassionate head and you instantly know they’re true. The only question is what to do about it all.


#11

So, you didn’t read the article, is that what we’re getting?


#12

Perhaps he’s disappointed.


#13

Because it’s completely possible to someone we would call totally fucked-up and evil, and still be intelligent. That and he likely has more insight in to what republicans are doing and thinking than you or me.


#14

“[C]lass … has increasingly become a division within the parties, not between them. Since 1984, nearly every Democratic presidential-primary race has ended as a contest between a ‘wine track’ … and a ‘beer track’ candidate … The Republicans have their equivalent in the battles between ‘Wall Street’ and ‘Main Street’ candidates. Until this decade, however, both parties—and especially the historically more cohesive Republicans—managed to keep sufficient class peace to preserve party unity. Not anymore, at least not for the Republicans …A substantial minority of Republicans—almost 30 percent—said they would welcome ‘heavy’ taxes on the wealthy, according to Gallup.”


@khepra is right that no one needs David Frum to see that the Reagan coalition has cracked apart on class lines. @doctorow is right that it’s galvanizing to read the admission in print from people like David Frum.


#15

You and your wacky ‘being reasonable’ thing.

Whatever are we going to do with you?


#16

Hey! How did you figure out who I am?


#17

No, Frum was a warmonger, actually. He actively supported the Iraq war, until it became unpopular. The alienation of the conservative-leaning white working class was completed by the wars of choice since 9/11. Frum is partially responsible for that, in that he beat the drums of war. And now he’s wondering what “went wrong”?

Frum helped create this shit we’re all swimming in and now he wants to deny all responsibility for it. I don’t know about you, but I’m sort of sick of the pundit class trying to have it both ways.


#18

They would have to get rid of first past the post/winner take all policies to splinter the teabaggers off and make other sub-parties and still have ‘their’ candidates have a chance.

I personally don’t see that happening.


#19

WTF is a “Democrat voter”? You mean Democratic, surely. Please don’t be as stupid as the Republicans who insist upon using a noun where an adjective is called for.


#20

Wow, are you for real?