New video emerges of black cosplayer running for his life from cops who then shot and killed him


#1

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#2

I hope worn cameras can force police departments to become more professional.

I’ve noticed a marked improvement in the professionalism of Chicago police, believe it or not. Unfortunately, it took a 20 year torture scandal to make it happen. I pray it doesn’t take more killings of young black men for a similar change in local police nationwide.


#3

That video doesn’t conclusively prove anything. Other than the guy was running and they were chasing him.


#4

What needs proving? After chasing him they killed him. That’s enough.


#5

Yep, fleeing a cop does not justify the death penalty.

If he was really a suspect, the proper response would be to call for backup to track him down or search for him with old fashioned detective work. No one gets to starts shooting because they’re out of breath and the target is getting away.


#6

I’m bracing for all the people saying it was entirely his fault for carrying a prop sword and not falling to his knees begging for his life.

Judging by the comments I see on related articles, the 12 year-old kid playing with a toy gun who got shot was completely responsible for the situation, not the grown professionals with real guns who pulled over for about 20 seconds before shooting. He absolutely deserved death without trial for playing ‘irresponsibly’ with a toy gun (in the land where the notion of banning real guns gets you death threats, no less!).

Contempt and suspicion towards black people runs so freaking deep. People instantly see the potentially menacing black guy, not some geek playing dress-up or some kid goofing off with his toy. It’s the victim’s fault for daring to assume they can play samurai, cops and robbers or cowboys and ind’juns like innocent white kids do instead of adhering to the rule that any movement a black person does can be interpreted as deadly intent.


#7

Absolutely right. But the video doesn’t show everything. I’m not saying the cops are innocent, just I can’t condemn on the information I have at this point.

He didn’t DESERVE death. It was the consequence of his actions. So yeah, he definitely played a large part in what happened. I finally saw that video. It was compressed/sped up, and the action was blocked by the car. So again, i can’t condemn anyone one way or another, but the way the scenario was presented it could have been justified. Or it could have been a career ending rookie mistake I don’t know.

Don’t worry, eventually we will replace these cops with the cool logic of robots.


#8

Christ, What An Asshole. ( although now I see Seki was paraphrasing other people)


#9

[quote=“Seki, post:6, topic:47018”]
Judging by the comments I see on related articles
[/quote]…

I believe these go together… i.e. that the commenters think the latter quote. Seki?


#10

holding an object whilst black, the poor custodians need to watch out


#11

Your bias is showing a bit. You assume that his actions were what precipitated the outcome, rather than allowing for the possibility that the police acted in such a way as to make him fear for his life - that they set things in motion. Prior to their arrival, he was just a guy carrying a toy sword, harming and menacing no one. Carrying even a real sword is perfectly legal, so it’s (legally) about the same as someone with an umbrella; strange for someone to be carrying around in Arizona, but unless he’s poking someone with it, not something the police should really be concerned about.


#12

Try being an elevator repairman in New York City…

Mechanics who work nights fixing rooftop elevators in public housing have had officers on vertical patrols aim guns at them, said Gregory Floyd, the president of Teamsters Local 237, which represents about 8,000 such workers.

“They are fearful of one day being mistaken for someone other than an elevator mechanic,” Mr. Floyd said of his members. - NYTimes


#13

I was referring to the kid with the airsoft gun.


#14

What do you conclude after adding in the fact he was shot in the back six times?

The use of deadly force requires justification. Typically protecting a life. Who’s life was protected? Who was in danger?

Let me guess. You believe the threat was to a random little old lady who might suffer a heart attack at the sight of a black man walking causally along a sidewalk dressed as a comic character. Is that why lethal force is acceptable? Do we need to protect our old womenfolk from the site of a black man dressed as a comic character? Or was it being on the sidewalk? Is that what made him a threat to our womenfolk?


#15

The problem with all these “officer-involved shootings” is that the shooting victims’ actions that lead to the consequence of their own shooting are not things that should get them shot.

Yes, if you review enough news stories of cops shooting people out of misunderstandings or misperceptions or because they’re just keyed up and ready to kill someone, you might be well-educated enough to know that a police officer will shoot you because you’re a member of a minority group, or because you reached for your wallet like he told you to, or because you didn’t follow his command as fast as he commanded you to, etc. But most people aren’t educated on how likely it is that a police officer will shoot you for these seemingly (and actually) innocent actions.

This victim was shot in the back. Unless he was standing over a person who he was about to kill, there’s no reason a police officer would need to shoot him in the back. Period. Full stop. And nothing the guy had previously done justifies that police action.

The reason some of these police-shooting victims are shot is because of police training. Police are trained to shoot to kill. They are also trained to use common excuses to justify shooting citizens. “It looked like he was going for a gun.” “I feared for my life.” “He was being aggressive.” These statements may be true in many circumstances, but they can’t be (and video evidence has proven that they haven’t been) true in every police shooting.


#16

Oh, FFS how many black people do cops have to shoot for you to get it? I think you’re trying to be just another rational person here. If it was just one case, we could argue the details. But: Tamir Rice, Cameron Tillman, VonDerrit Myers Jr., Laquan McDonald, Carey Smith-Viramontes, Qusean Whitten, Miguel Benton, Dillon McGee… This is happening almost every day: http://www.occupy.com/article/black-man-killed-us-every-28-hours-police


#17

How terrible! Like “shot in the back 6 times” not enough to show that he was hunted?

Justice is about ending a cycle. What must be done is enforcing proper protocol when something similar happens in the future. We can’t be sure if it has to do with race, but no one would deny that a Black man should have the same benefit of the doubt as everyone else when carrying a weapon-like object. On the other hand, we don’t want police to not stop people who are actually dangerous.

These injustice seem to be happening more often lately probably because there are more surveillance. Back in the days, they’d just close the case without trial due to lack of witnesses. It’s just like “Training Day”, isn’t it? They believe it is not about what happened, but what you can proof.


#18

Now I understand: It was his choose-your-own-adventure and he opted for death.
(my nodding head slowly transitioning to left-right motion)

http://thinkprogress.org/justice/2014/10/10/3578877/black-teens-were-21-times-more-likely-to-be-shot-dead-by-the-cops-reported-deaths-suggest/


#19

I have to disagree with you about the 12 year old. The police were called because that child had the gun in the waistband of his pants, and he continued to pull it out and put it in. He took off the orange safety indicator, making it indistinguishable from an actual firearm. When the officer told him not to move, the child reached for his waist band.

He was a scared child and he was probably going to show the officer that it was fake, but he made a very bad decision. If someone who thinks you have a weapon points their weapon at you and tells you not to move, you do not reach for your toy gun. So yes, it was irresponsible. The most dangerous person with a gun is a child. They do not think about the consequences down the road. They are running on impulse or they have no idea what they’re doing.

Did he deserve to die? Absolutely not. But he made very poor choices that you left out of your comment for the sake of your argument.


#20

Seems to me that the most dangerous person with a gun is a police officer.