NYPD arrest human rights lawyer for waiting outside a restaurant while her kids used the bathroom


#1

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#2

The stripes on that dress are clearly a code detailing a terrorist attack on America.

And even if they’re not, can our Boys in Blue take a chance by letting her wander the streets, willing and able to destroy our freedoms by wearing a dress with encoded plans for a terrorist attack on America?


#3

I think that I was treated differently because of being a woman

Wait what’s the percentage of women in new york? I mean it’s at least half, right? Yeah that may not be the “point” but it’s still a pretty silly thing to say.


#4

“Excuse me officer, My husband took my two children into the restaurant to use the bathroom”.

There. Problem solved. No arrest.


#5

Yes, supplication to authority is always an option, obviously. But why? Why should a person who’s not blocking traffic or doing anything to interfere with anybody or anything have to explain themselves to a police officer?


#6

Or, the police officers could simply respect the constitutional rights of the citizens that they supposedly serve. There, problem solved. Right?


#7

Yes. Instantly assume a submissive stance or try licking the officers boots.


#8

His suggestion shows the reality of police interaction in the US: Why explain yourself? Because they can kill you without getting punished.


#9

My first thought was because she’s a human rights lawyer in the city of stop and frisk and kill people selling cigarettes on the street was the NYPD following her and just waiting for a chance to intimidate her and bust her?


#10

[quote=“skaag, post:4, topic:40591, full:true”]
“Excuse me officer, My husband took my two children into the restaurant to use the bathroom”.

There. Problem solved. No arrest.
[/quote]That’s uh… not how things work for Black and brown people.


#11

Yeah. I was wondering how the incident got started, and then I saw her photo.


#12

“I’m not resisting arrest. My husband took my kids to the bathroom in Ruby Tuesday,” Huq said she told the officers.


#13

One of the basic truths that I have been avoiding confronting, but has seemed more painfully obvious than usual lately, is that no matter how blatant the police abuse of people of color, a lot of people, almost all white, will take the side of the police.


#14

My thoughts also, though maybe not following her, they probably just saw someone they had a grudge against and took the opportunity to give her a hard time. Her insufficiently deferential response was just the excuse they needed to arrest her for “cheeking the police”.


#15

Arrested for standing while being brown… I feel so much safer now, thanks NYPD!

Again, another argument for police cameras. Not blocking the sidewalk? No reason to arrest her, but the cameras would prove this.

I really don’t know why someone doesn’t make a hidden camera show just filming unlawful arrests in the US, it would be a massive internet hit (since no network would show it).

The real reason the police arrested her? Because they could. 10 minutes ‘work’ for them and 9 hours of inconvenience for her, and then next time she’ll just walk away…


#16

Officer Lathrop apparently doesn’t like his actions recorded either: NYPD Increasingly Recorded by Public.


#17

#18

I remember watching “Cops” decades ago and counting the constitutional violations televised proudly around the country. Unlawful police behavior. There is already plenty of police misbehavior on youtube.

The problem with any video though is that it doesn’t give the whole picture. It doesn’t show what happened before the start of the video, and only shows one camera angle which is neither what the victim nor the cop saw with their eyes. Same for hearing.


#19

Christ, what a bunch of fascist assholes.


#20

Police Officers are incredibly unlucky when it comes to arresting people.
100% of the time, everyone resits arrest.

I heard a good counterpoint to the usual ‘all cops are bad’ meme from my favourite philosopher, Sam Harris, the other day and I admit it kinda put their behaviour in a context I hadn’t really given much weight before.

They are so on edge because of the dangerous job that they do, so when a cop approaches the side of your car after pulling you over, hand on holster, asking you to ‘please keep your hands where I can see them’ it’s not that they are deliberately escalating the situation into a game life and death, it already is that situation for them. They can’t afford not to take those kinds of precautions because for all they know, you are that one in a thousand lunatic that up and kills them for being a cop.

It probably is for the best to just agree with the ‘On-Edge, Armed and Perfectly Willing to Kill You’-Officer and follow any instructions that they give, you can sue them later, you will (more probably) still be alive to do that.

The obvious imperfection in this situation is that she seems to have initially responded with a phrase that is interpretable as something other than dull compliance, she only informed them of her reasons for being there after they had begun to physically assault, I mean arrest her.
So that, of course, is the first thing apologists like @skaag will latch on to. But @skaag is a troll so don’t let that get you down. Real people don’t consider it an excuse.

The shell game has been forced to become, ‘What do you value more? Your rights or your life?’ The Police know they are doing this, the courts and judges and politicians know that they are doing this but it’s too convenient a method of populace control to be anything other than enshrined in practice, lazy mother fuckers.

I would have like to have seen what would have happened if she had immediately said something about her reasons for being there, rather than to (rightly) question why she was being asked to move but only because I believe the situation would have ended the exact same way. They probably were targeting her.

My only suggestion for this kind of behaviour is to amplify compliant malfeasance when it comes to obeying the orders of a cop. Usually this means a person in a situation following orders or job requirements to the absolute letter, when they know such a strict and unbending interpretation will actually result in harm for the entity for which they are performing the work.

Well, why can’t this same theme be applied to ridiculous cops and their nonsense intimidation? You want her to move into the flow of people? Sure.
Walk up and down the length of the building. She is now in the flow of foot traffic and ‘obeying’ the order.

If they still feel the need to escalate, they are gonna be more prone to making a mistake in their contortions of reality and leave themselves more open to costly court cases.

Compliant malfeasance.