Old dentists' office walls are full of thousands of "buried teeth"


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2018/10/27/poor-r-value.html


#2

quark-but-why


#3

Is that where I was supposed to put them all?


#4

They’re historical! Plus in the future we can clone the teeth’s possessors because, um, okay, why?


#5

I wonder if this is anything like the razor blade wall slots that old homes used to have.


#6

What? And the razors just fell behind the wall and stayed there?


#7

An overlooked method of insulation?


#8

Yes. Seriously. https://boards.straightdope.com/sdmb/showthread.php?t=223599


#9

That’s… that’s amazing!

And they didn’t even bother to put some wooden studs or something there even to sort of box them in?

The mind boggles!


#10

With isotope analysis, we can definitely map where the people came from. And if I understand correctly, they are all older than the first tests of atomic bombs, so this could be quite interesting, at the very least for calibration curves.


#11

Yes, it very much is a real life metaphor of pushing problems into the future for others to worry about.


#12

Well, the rusty old razor blades we inherited in our 60 year-old house stayed there behind the wall … until a few months ago when we had to have a plumber in to replace some leaky drain pipes behind said wall. My wife and I had to dispose of dozens (hundreds?) of jagged tetanus vectors.

“Safety” razor, my eye.


#13

2708424367_242ceeb7e7


#14

“The museum would be pleased to receive the teeth”

Now there’s a sentence you don’t hear every day.


#15

Seems sensible to me. Everyone who enters into the practice of dentistry(endodotics is bogged down in ongoing negotiations over whether it’s merely tooth-adjacent surgery or under the jurisdiction of the unseelie court’s tooth fairies) places themselves in particular debt to the tooth fairy; and having a suitable offering on hand can protect the entire building on those unpredictable occasions when a tithe is claimed.


#16

Now, are we sure it really was a dentist’s office?
This has “Tooth Fairy” written all over it.


#17

The oldest place I ever lived in was a row house in Montreal built in the 1870s, in an old Irish neighbourhood (essentially a slum until the 1980s). No slots for razors but the cellar was just a rough dirt floor. The mind boggled at what might be buried under there.


#18

I’m guessing there are often cavities in the teeth in the cavities?


#19

Only if the tooth fairy looks like this:


#20

I’ll bet that’s where they put the bad children. The teeth are all that’s left.