On the proper care and feeding of horn-rimmed glasses


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2016/11/29/on-the-proper-care-and-feeding.html


#2


#3

…and here I thought they were called “horn-rimmed” because of the pointy corners. I didn’t know it was real horn!


#4

I do believe you’re thinking of harlequin frames, as frequently found on ladies in The Far Side.


#5

I would have called those “cat’s eye”.

Now, I’m not sure what I think. :confused: Damn this thread!


#6

[quote=“jlw, post:1, topic:90313”]Wipe your horn rim glasses down with mineral oil or vitamin E oil once every 3 months or so.[/quote]This sounds fishy to me. Is Vitamin E known for its use in materials preservation? I suppose technically it is an antioxidant.


#7

It is simply an oil that will a) feed the bone and keep it from drying out and b) not going to create problems in contact with your skin. It is only fishy if you use salmon or other sea-derived oil (which will smell, but be OK in contact with your skin.)


What is your Band Name, Rapper Name, Album Name
#8

Just slap some tuna on it


#9

“Mineral oil, you say?”


#10

[quote=“Donald_Petersen, post:4, topic:90313”]
I do believe you’re thinking of harlequin frames, as frequently found on ladies in The Far Side. [/quote]

Doh! I, too, thought that these were one in the same. I had no idea actual horn was involved. I also didn’t know that there were frames that needed so much care…

just think hair perm. Human hair is similar to Horn in fiber structure as well. Ladies use hot air hair blower and clips to hold hair in shape. The natural horn don’t grow straight! Manufacturers use steel plates and heat to press horn stakes flat and further grind them to smooth out the surface, thereafter, process the horn piece to build eyewear fronts or temples. Unfortunately, horn has its own memory system, they like to go back to its original shape just like human hair. So, we need to use mineral oil or baby oil to wet the temples and fingers (recommend to wear fire fighters glove) to hold temples for adjustment. …Enforce consumers to moisture their horn glasses with mineral oil or baby oil and clean up on on weekly basis or at least once a month… Or…remove lens, mask up hinges and spray coat a layer of PU base varnish for them after adjustment. The coating will preserve moisture in the horn fiber for a looooooong looooong time.

– Jerry Huang, frame manufacturer
http://www.optiboard.com/forums/showthread.php/58897-Buffalo-Horn-Frames


#11

I learned the distinction from my mother, who wore harlequin glasses at some point in the 50s. My first glasses were horn-rimmed, and I hated them. Wire rims for me now.


#12

the proper… feeding of horn-rimmed glasses

That’s what horned owls are for, right?


#13

After years and years, I’ve damaged my Persol sunglasses by frequently hanging them from my t-shirt and letting a temple (Arm? Branch? How do you call that?!) rub against my skin… I had no idea that could even be a problem!


#14

Wait, are wire-rims actual wire? I thought faux-wire was used these days.


#15

Today on bOING bOING I learned that British money and cool glasses are both not friendly to vegans.


#16

On sale at leading opticians – in gay colors

I like them!


#17


#18

With all this “horny” this and “rimming” that talk who could have even known it was about glasses!?


#19

…and rubbing oil on stuff.

Whew! It’s getting hot in here.


#20

“Never before told - the secret origins of the glasses fetish!”