Orthodox Rabbi declares cloned pork kosher


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2018/03/22/orthodox-rabbi-declares-cloned.html


#2

I suppose a slab of meat grown in a lab has neither cloven hooves nor the ability to chew cud.

It’ll be interesting to see how people relate to meat that’s never been part of an animal, once we get through the initial adjustment phase. I take stories like this as a generally positive sign


#3

#4

I’ll say it again, as soon as I can purchase meat “grown” from bodies without higher brain functions, I’m all over that. This tech can’t arrive soon enough, and if it also helps remove these sorts of religious restrictions as well? All the better.


#5

What is with organised religions and their food restrictions?


#6

I think he’s confusing “cloned pork” with “tofu.”


#7

Eating shellfish in the desert is a bad idea. Think of them as Rough Guide books instead of religious tracts and it all seems rather more sensible…


#8

I just popped into the comments to give Jason propers for the unexpected Hebrew Hammer reference. That was the last thing I expected to see this morning.


#10

Yea, St. Peter said the same thing a while ago. Did anybody listen?


#11

says Rabbi Yuval Cherlow of the Tzohar Rabbinical Organization.

Don’t fuck with the Tzohar


#12

Pre germ theory sanitation. Most of the Kosher laws are cleverly contrived to avoid or destroy spoilage bacteria, mold and animal flesh that tends to be infectious or toxic.


#13

And the Lord said - Let there be bacon!


#14

An endless vat of self replicating bacon? Sign me up!


#15

Sacrilicious!


#16

Marvin Harris proposed that pigs, not being ruminants, must be fed on the same grains that could otherwise be consumed by humans, and accordingly pig husbandry would be a wasteful luxury for a nomadic desert tribe. (After all, there’s nothing inherently “unclean” about pork meat – pigs only wallow in their own filth if they lack any alternative.)

But then, I am in no place to argue whether his theories were of any particular value.


#17

I don’t have any moral qualms with the idea of vat-grown meat… but I wonder how, at industrial-commercial scales that much organism without much of an immune system, possible requiring it’s own antibiotic regimen, may serve to, yet again, make us excellent pathogen farmers?


#18

Important questions to solve as part of this process. Replicating the same sorts of defences nature already provides through the epidermis and immune systems is obviously a good start.


#19

The Bible says “You may eat any animal that has a divided hoof and that chews the cud.” No matter if the animal is cloned, pigs do not chew the cud. Of course what do I know, I love bacon.


#20

Woman: Could I interest you in a free-sample bacon cheeseburger?

The Hebrew Hammer: Um, well, I thank you, gentile friend, for your generous offer of that… deliciously unkosher snack. I… sadly have to decline… for I already stuffed myself full of milk and meat products at a previous lunch engagement.


#21

Religion is so Kosher.