Pile of "folded" snow


#1

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#2

Shoop baby! You can tell by the pixels.


#3

cowtip


#4

Yeah, I'm not even from a state that gets snow, but the winters I have spent up north tell me this is not real. Snow doesn't "slide" off of things, so much as it slops off, and that only as it melts.

Even if we assume some form of ice/snow mixture, there's no way it would survive the initial drop from the slide to the ground intact in order to let anything build up. Snow is not viscous enough to behave this way. If you couldn't get pudding to behave like this, you couldn't get even the slushiest, "slideiest" snow to do so.

The only way I could see this being real is if it's one of the more bizarre and rare ice formations produced by some inexplicable temperature and pressure conditions.


#5

Snow does some weird things, especially when the surfaces upon which it accumulates aren't frozen solid through anymore. I've seen it fall off like a sheet from my car's hood, but that usually breaks up when it hits the ground - perhaps with the slide being low to the ground it would stick together.


#6

It's a beautiful visual. Just enjoy.


#8

This is not fake. I've seen the same thing happen off of the hood of my car. Snow can do unexpected things when it's just barely above/below the freezing point.

This is from my backyard a couple of years ago:

Edit: If this image is super small, just right click and "view image" it. I don't know why the BBS software decided to shrink it down to a 10x10 thumbnail.


#9

I'm sure it's real. I've seen it happen from my metal roof onto the top of the high snow bank under it. Not as graceful as this pic, but folded like a sheet.


#10

I went into my office and sure enough... Nature is amazing.


#11

Why the sneer-quotes? It actually is folded snow.


#12

Next you'll be telling us there's spherical snow.


#13

I won't be satisfied until there's origami snow.


#14

rather ice than snow

http://epod.usra.edu/blog/2013/12/frost-flower-in-western-missouri.html

and a sphere too

http://epod.usra.edu/blog/2014/03/frosted-globe.html


#15

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