Science Babe goes after Dr. Mercola, Food Babe, Dr. Oz, et al


#1

[Permalink]


#2

Mercola. I remember reading some his screed hyping up the “dangers” of EM radiation from electronics, then conveniently linked to his webshop where he peddled ferrite rings for cables.

For 5 or 10 times the per-item cost you could get them for from electronics shops.


#3


#4

You can be a populist quack like Dr. Oz or an elitist quack like Food Babe, but your polished turds still stink.


#5

I prefer my source’s recommendations for protection from that sort of thing. Much cheaper.


#6

Depends. Helps against radiatively coupled EMI[1]. For conduction mode, you need the ferrites. Not that the EMI is of any harm to you, but the lab instruments and especially the input amps and receivers tend to complain.

[1] Doesn’t help much against magnetic field coupling. I got a feedback once even through a layer of tinned sheetmetal in which the receiver and its chokes were enclosed. The culprit was the pair of chokes in the output amp filter; the lil’ bitches coupled right through the steel! (Moving them to the other end of the box solved the issue.)


#7

#8

I would not have expected this piece to have gained any more traction than any other piece critical of Food Babe. How gladdening.

Of course, it is also somewhat ironic that Askmen’s sidebar linkage to their “Diet & Eating” and “Health & Sports” articles is festooned with more sensationalist headlines of highly dubious pedigree. (Now that bashing anti-vax is so trendy, wouldn’t it be nice if “news” sources sought to clean up the rest of their act?)


#9

I get ya, but I somehow doubt that an additional ferrite ring around a cable on consumer equipment is going to do a whole lot to protect from killer radiation. And he’s hawking the things for cell phones…


#10

I enjoyed how one of the Food Babe’s rebuttals against the Science Babe was that she was gainfully employed as a scientist.

::face palm::


#11

#12

I read Science Babe’s takedown of Food Babe. Good stuff indeed.


#13

Maybe it’s just the angle of the photo, but she looks like Eddie Izzard’s kid.


#14

But they’re SHINY! And history will remember them as excellect coprolites!


#15

I have no quibbles with Science Babe’s rubbishing of various quacks, but her self promotion’s a little weird. She claims she was a professor, yet has no doctoral degree. Really? Also no published research in chemistry I could find on Google Scholar.


#16

An awful lot of popularizers and science journalists have nothing but a B.S. That doesn’t invalidate the science they report.


#17

The more I read the gawker article, the more fishy things I read. She casts aspersions on the idea that passengers are sprayed with pesticides on airplane flights, when, in fact this does happen (along with all the other passengers, I’ve been sprayed with an insecticide during a refueling stop in the Ivory Coast). The WHO has an article describing the disinsection procedure.


#18

That’s a completely different issue from her credentials, isn’t it?


#19

A careful scientist usually exercises circumspection and does some research before debunking myths.


#20

The term “professor” does not necessarily imply a doctorate, if it’s not being used as a specific title.

She says she “worked as a chemistry professor”, which the degrees she publicly lists would permit.