Sugru + magnets = anything stuck to anything


#1

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#2

Why sorry? Why not Sugru + Lego? Everybody wins!


#3

I used Sugru on my passport drive, so I could attach it to my fridge and I remember to run back ups. Now it looks like all my files are written in ancient Babylonian. What gives?


#4

The data is magnetic...your data is now between your drive & fridge! Do you want fries with that?


#5

So, the stuff is basically duct putty?


#6

It's basically silicone and corn starch: http://www.instructables.com/id/How-To-Make-Your-Own-Sugru-Substitute/

Is duct putty like that? I've never heard of it. Is it like plumber's putty? If so, then I believe Sugru dries to a more durable state.


#7

I meant its basically duct tape in semi fluid form.

if you can't duct it...


#8

Snow crash.


#9

This actually looks really useful, but I think I'll be going with the Instructables method if I do fix my lights onto my bike like that. Any idea how durable it would actually be?


#10

Magnets, you say? How do they work?


#11

In the future, try using a magnet not possessed by the malevolent Old Gods of the fertile crescent (seriously, those guys are pissed about losing marketshare to YAHWEH, and they know how to hold a grudge).

An ordinary magnet should result in corrupt data; but substantially reduces the risk of ghastly supernormal happenings within your household. I recommend it.

(Edit: in all seriousness, though, a contemporary high-coercivity platter based drive is actually nontrival to damage with external magnetic fields. Especially the desktop ones, since they just have more case between the outside world and the platters, and magnetic fields drop off at approximately the cube of distance, so even magnets with scary-strong fields at their surface weaken rapidly. I wouldn't recommend it; but don't expect erasure. Floppies, definitely, those were low-coercivity and lived in very thin cases; but HDDs are made of sterner stuff, mostly because anything less stern wouldn't reliably store data in the tiny magnetic regions that modern drives use, not because they care about users with magnets.)


#12

Magnets and Sugru is a great idea: great for holding towels to fridges and gloves together but holding on bike lights, I don't think that'll work very well. Your bike puts up with a lot more force than just bouncing by the side of the road. You're going to lose the lights every time you hit a big bump or wipe out - even with these giant magnets they're selling. (not to mention that they'll rotate) The magnets themselves have a coating and that coating breaks off over time and the magnet corrode. Better to seal the magnets in the Sugru is you're going to be using them outside. At least, these are my findings with Sugru and magnets.


#13

Yeah, I guessed there would be significant problems with that solution. Encasing the magnets in the sugru would just make it more likely that the lights would come off, so it probably wouldn't be an improvement. It does look very convenient though, especially as the fitting for my front light is broken.


#14

I've used Sugru for years now, ever since it was mailed to you in a handwritten envelope from England. I'm a fan, but buy Sugru with a specific plan in mind and execute it. Don't just put it in the tool box, because it will go bad. 6 months after you buy them, it longer works.


#15

Is there an advantage of this method over using good ol epoxy putty?


#16

That's also part of the recipe for making silicone molds that will set up more efficiently.
I did not try making sugru that way (yet), but the molds are flexible once set.

Of all my worldly possessions, the one thing that goes where I go is my box of Stuff That Sticks Stuff to Other Stuff, and my Box of Magnets, because they also stick stuff to other stuff, as well as supply a lifetime of general entertainment value. Not even kidding. Most of life's practical failures are a direct result of inability or failure to securely tick stuff to other stuff. The sound of one hand clapping? That, too, could have been entirely avoided. (You are now offishully enlightened, btw. Peace, my brothuhs.)

I suggest, with the bike light, consider making a molded containment for your magnets, but you can use the homemade silicone/cornstarch mix for that. (Silicone is used to make non-slip surfaces, so could be helpful in keeping the light where you want it. Can't tell more without looking.) Don't use 'big' magnets at all. Use several small neodymium mags spaced around your mold instead. You can hit any one magnet at just the right angle and break the field, but it's unlikely any one bump could disconnect them all. The plating is basically just there to keep the magnets together, because they are relatively soft inside - but they are crazy strong!

The knifeholders sold as kitchen equipment at IKEA have some really beautiful neos in them. Those also have to be very strong, because...butcher knives vs. toes. Mounted mine on the fridge instead of a wall, nearly lopped off some digits when the mags slammed onto the fridge. So, that good. Plus, dirt cheap. You could snag those magnets for other purposes.


#17

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