Table made of a floating matrix of wooden blocks with embedded magnets


#1

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#2

I bet it's fun when you walk near it and your pocketknife (and pants) are pulled into one of the gaps. Also fun to discover that your credit cards don't work afterward.


#3

The tables are acclaimed for their capricious, yet sturdy
disposition.

I'm just not ready to look for particular attitudes from my furniture. I'm happy enough to find a few quarters amongst the cushions.


#4

This needs to be painted in Rubik's cube colors, stat!


#5

Not to mention your cell phone and laptop.


#6

Table made of, "oh great, more stupid toys for rich people".


#7

In a different configuration that could make for strangely comfy seating.


#8

I presume one should keep one's hard drive away from this thing...


#9

I'm imagining a similar piece by way of a retort and comment on our decadence...

It's basically exactly the same thing except with a power cord and electromagnets instead.

Hey, it'd be fun to run those magnets on AC...


#10

Actually, IIRC the inverse square law of radiation means you need a seriously huge field to wipe a HDD; the distance between the platter/s and the outside of the drive is enough to negate the effect of any neodymium magnet that's not too big to safely play with...

...I think - that's just off the top of my head, so you might want to check that before testing on a real HDD.


#11

Please advise just what in a cell phone is damaged by magnets. Seeing as my phone detects a car dock by placing it against one. A laptop, maybe, but it would have to be a damn strong one.


#12

Compromising the beauty of an object by having to present it as a functional device is a real shame. So it doesn't make a good table for your electronic device, so what, it's a beautiful object on it's own. Functionality is over-rated.


#13

I don't care that it'd spill my drinks - this thing is awesome!


#14

I can't be the only one who thinks the logo at the end looks like two people getting it on


#15

It's not magnetized, it's "magnetized". It's an arrangement of fine steel cables that aren't visible in the video but very aparent in the photos, if you know what you are looking for.


#16

First hint: Magnets just don't work that way.

(at least with non-superconducting materials)


#17

but think of the fun you can have by cutting them with your ceramic knife.

Bet you the owner will spend at least three hours trying to re-balance the cubes.


#18

Disappointing lack of ICP-related comments ITT


#19

Or even if you don't.

Sometimes wonder if Cory even reads the pages he links or whether it's enough to simply have MAGNETS! 3D PRINTING! somewhere in the first paragraph and up it goes.


#20

yeah i'll avoid putting my 5 1⁄4" floppy disks on it thanks for the warning