That sea salt you bought probably has microplastics in it


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2017/05/12/that-sea-salt-you-bought-proba.html


#2

Well what if it’s artisanal?


I refuse to believe that this "smart" salt shaker is real
#3

And organic.


#4

Serves us right.


#5

What’s good enough for plankton is good enough for us.

Honestly it never occurred to me that “sea salt” was derived from current seas. I thought the term meant it came from salt flats left over from ancient seas. The reality seems gross to me even without considering the problem of micro plastics.


#6

It depends, some areas make their own sea salt. Where i grew up there’s some low lying plains that get flooded by sea water when the tide is high, So they’ve made it to where sea water water is retained in plots of land and the water slowly evaporates until all you have left is pink rock salt :slight_smile: it’s pretty cool looking


#7

lol, I feel so vindicated eschewing that pricey, dirty salt in favor of nice clean rock salt.


#8

That’s canning salt…it’s standard NaCl, it just has no anti-clumping additives or anything else that would cause a canned jar of food to turn cloudy.

Morton used to make the standard blue box that just said rock salt on it. Now a days it’s this:

Personally I use this most of the time:


#9

Insoluble fiber is good for your digestive health. You’re welcome.


#10

Now I wanna go home and tear into the jar of eggs and beets I pickled last year.


#11

I pretty much only buy kosher salt :slight_smile: i do keep a box of standard salt but i hardly ever touch it.


#12

We’re being micro-dosed with Miralax. That’s the Trumpcare pharmacy benefit.


#13

their website says “*Morton Ice Cream Salt is NOT intended for consumption.” ??

I guess rock salt is the wrong term… I only mean salt that has been mined from a mineral deposit. Not necessarily course grain halite with all its natural inclusions.


#14

What goes around comes around.

That plastic has probably been eaten and digested already, too.


#15

Couldn’t find a nicer picture of the area, but then again i’m at work. Here’s the area where i grew up that was known for their salt production


#16

“Rock salt” as I have always known it was never to be consumed, we always used it for ice cream making. It literally had rocks in it…


#17

This where salt comes from, in my old hometown (but not my old neighborhood):
http://detroitsalt.com/history/


#18

went off sea salt over a year ago so what’s new
…but I do like my black pepper


#19

I was once on scientific conference in Slovenia, and there was a tour of Piran Saltworks (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sečovlje_Saltworks ). The saltworks are a part of a landscape park ( https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sečovlje_Salina_Landscape_Park ) and they still use production methods and tools not much different form medieval ones. It’s hard to get more artisanal than that :slight_smile:
The traditional process of getting white salt is actually quite complex, involving layers of specially cultivated algae that purify it.


#20

I use “Pure HImalayan Ancient Sea Salt”; they didn’t have plastic in “ancient” times, so I’m cool, right? And it’s from Pakistan. I got mine at Marshall’s, so it was $3.99/lb. instead of $7.99.
http://www.laselvabeachspice.com/shop/1lb-pure-himalayan-sea-salt