The jar of peanut butter costs $761 and you aren't supposed to eat it

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I’ve sometimes thought that computer programming is a desperate effort to realize the fantasy of Platonic ideas in a universe that simply doesn’t work that way.

And then here’s the NIST, with the Platonic ideal jar of peanut butter on a shelf.

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You actually get three jars for that price, so it’s really $253.67 per jar.

According to https://www-s.nist.gov/srmors/view_detail.cfm?srm=1567b, you can get 50g of wheat flour for $472. So a 5 lb bag (Standard US size) would be $107K and change.

A bargain!

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Peanut butter, peanut butter… we have the most expensive peanut butter!
You can’t spread it, you can’t eat it, you can’t make a PBJ.
Just look at the sad label all the night and all the day.
We think you’d like it but we’re not allowed to say
Whether it tastes better than Jif or Skippy or Peter Pan…
Just be glad we didn’t put it in a can!
[voiceover] Sold only in government testing facilities. Not for internal use.

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I would have loved to have seen my university lab technician catch an undergrad student feeding peanut butter into a GCMS. It would probably have ended with ABH via a retort stand.

Anyone know why this peanut butter is considered ‘ideal’? Was it created in a lab to avoid contamination, so they can say it is 100 percent pure peanut butter?

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this stuff is perfectly regular peanut butter.

I would hope that it might be produced according to some rigorous standard and subsequently subjected to a battery of tests to ensure uniformity within a carefully-defined statistical framework. But it also wouldn’t surprise me if, in the end, it turned out to be ordinary Skippy with a huge mark-up. (They probably save the other stuff for the molecular gastronomists.)

Peanut butter can be so mysterious.

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I can imagine injecting either an extract in a suitable solvent, filtered to not clog the column, or, more likely for GCMS, the vapors from the headspace (for aroma analysis).

For less volatile stuff I could imagine using LC-MS or other hyphenated analytical technology.

Reference samples are a must-have. With the hopefully increasing availability of home-lab instrumentation, I can see a growing market for these.

Gosh, I’d hate to see the price for the Organic jars.

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They make organic jars now? A fool and his money…

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It’s almost certainly 100% pure peanut butter, but even if not, I bet the cost here is to make damned sure it’s cooked at exactly the same temperature, pressure, time, etc.

It’s not so much that it’s ideal, but that it’s the same stuff for everyone who is using it for testing.

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The plastic ones.
The glass jars are the inorganic ones.

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We can’t know whether it truly is ideal peanut butter without knowing - crunchy or smooth?

Steps back to watch the thread explode, like a thread about cyclists vs. motorists.*

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What about… “none, and double the jelly”?

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On that note, what solvent do “organic” dry cleaners use? Good ole Methylene Chloride?

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At last they don’t spend too much (money and time) in packaging !

These customers are the good kind; not influenced by packaging, focused just at the substance.

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Steps up to claim no_prize, Kanye is outraged I won’t give up non existent no_prize to Beyoncé.

https://soundcloud.com/damian-barajas/rpbj

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