Things Millennials Are Killing


#1

I keep wondering if there’s a thread for such a thing, if so i apologize for the duplicate. Every time i see such an article i die a little inside over the stupidity. Anyway here’s the most recent one i’ve seen, apparently Millennial are killing Goodwill.

https://finance.yahoo.com/news/goodwill-overrun-stuff-millennials-gen-151400853.html


#2

Damn it, I was trying to kill the Salvation Army! Oh well, I’ll take what I can get.


#3

one NASA jumpsuit at a time.


#4

Applebees, Beer, Napkins, Breasturants, Cereal, Golf, Motorcycles, Home Ownership, Yogurt, Bars of Soap, Diamonds, Fabric Softener, Banks, Department Stores, Designer Handbags, Gyms, Home Depot, Football, Oil…

Muuuurder!

I’m NOT a millennial but I am doing my best to kill napkins!


#5

Reading the article it looks like they are dumping the cruft of the their parents. As a Gen Xer I have been dumping a lot of cruft from my life over the years. Oh look a pile of paperbacks I haven’t looked at in 5+ years, off to goodwill. I really should go through the CD collection.
There are definitely things I want to keep as I can’t get digital versions and they are things I have to hunt down as well as they give me a joy to have but if I organized our extras a bit better the cruft will easily stack up and hide in plain sight, god knows I have and to a much lesser extent now a lot of miniatures gaming stuff that could go.

Per the article as stated heirloom dishes? There was a time when things like dinner ware even everyday stuff was expensive but now, pff, you can get perfectly serviceable stuff from the dollar store now. It is a common commodity in just 2 generations. Also how many of them can afford a house so you actually have the space for an extra set of dishes to use maybe 3 times a year? Never mind the sofa that will probably need reupholstering at this point and all the other things.

ETA and I have been thinking maybe the house and yard are too much damn hassle. Maybe I am just too ubran a boy but the idea of not so much less house but definitely way less yard is quite appealing and if there are options to be out and about less house is even appealing.


#6

can please DIAF already… along with TGIFridays and the numerous other upscale mcfood chains.


#7

The nature of the “things” in question highly depends. There’s a good number of things from my parents that i really would have no use for nor the space, but a lot are just that. Objects that have no real value despite them being fairly nice, if i were to get rid of them i don’t think it would hurt my parents feelings. However family albums, my dad’s books, some memorabilia that my mom collected from us growing up i would be inclined to keep. They also have some really beautiful paintings they’ve collected from when we lived in Venezuela, i would be really sad if i had to get rid of those.


#8

Have a house and a set of china plus silver and crystal that lives in boxes because we don’t have room for dinner wear we never use. I’m set to inherit 3 other sets of china. What the everlovingfuck am I supposed to do with all this ancient cruft?


#9

I would rather have a single set of well made dishes can be used everyday but are good enough for double duty for the fancy things.


#10

SAVE GOODWILL


#11

Precisely. Who needs all this crap? Collectibles? How long will it take me to convert them into cold, hard cash, which is what I really need? I have to sell each one on Ebay? Fuck that, don’t have time. To the dump with this fine china, then. To hell with it.

I want plates that can bounce off a tile floor, unscathed. If that means plastic or paper, then so be it.


#12

Likewise, i’m not fussy enough to have extra fancy serving dishes, silverware and glasses like my mom has. I would be terrified of breaking it or having a guest mess them up. I would potentially keep them only if my mom specifically asked but otherwise i wouldn’t want them.


#13

Applebees is mostly dead in Chicagoland… a single franchise operator ran most of them here and imploded a few years ago. It’s kind of a shame, as they were one of the few places open late where my choral group could go after rehearsals.

Some of the former locations are still unoccupied, due to the weirdness of commercial real estate, where it can be cheaper to build new than to buy or lease an existing spot.


#14

Since when is it just millennials doing that? I am not a millennial, and the only reason I ever have to go to our bank branch is if I need to deposit a paper check, and I do that at the bank’s ATM. Paychecks and government refunds and insurance payments and almost everything else goes in via direct deposit. Bills get paid online. Every corner shop has a cash machine, but the number of places I know of that don’t take debit cards can be counted on the fingers of one hand.

The only reason I ever need to go speak to a teller is if I have to deposit a check in US dollars into our Canadian dollar account, and with wire transfers and paypal, I almost never need to do that anymore either.

I am given to understand that banking is still stuck in the 20th century in America, but surely most of this is applicable down there as well?


#15

I’m sure this is in large part because folks are urbanizing, which usually means smaller homes.


#16

By having it take up valuable space in my basement?

@tobin: Kids will disabuse you of the notion that you should have nice plates.
We use Sweedish Kmart’s cheap crockery and plastic cups from Yuppie Bigbox.


#17

Exactly. I think that with the advent of internet banking we are all killing physical banks. It’s not just millennials. The BI article stated that the reason that millennials are killing banks was largely attributed to “mistrust”. I disagree. It’s the smart phone and web browser we all use. As @Grey_Devil says, articles like these saying that it’s millennials killing these things are kind of silly.

Nous sommes tous millénaires!


#18

Scotiabank lets me do that with an app on my phone and photos now. I literally have NO reason to visit a bank and I don’t think I have in at least five years (and then, only to get a rush replacement for a damaged bank card).


#19

yeah, been there… he is 15 now so not quite worried about that anymore.


#20

I wouldn’t mind owning a large home, if the space was designed in a smart way. Which is often not the case unless one had the money to have a custom home built. My parents current home is a 2 story McMansion and has loads of wasted space in the main area and the upstairs bedrooms have ceilings that are ridiculously high. Can’t see myself being able to afford a home any time soon though.