Tremor-correcting steadicam cutlery


#1

[Permalink]


#2

That’s wonderful! The smiles on the faces of the people using the spoons show just how much this is going to change their lives.


#3

Can they adapt this into a highball glass for serious alcoholics?


#4

…and in ten or twenty years or so, it might get FDA approval as a medical device. :stuck_out_tongue:


#5

I really like this. A few of my patients are embarrassed by their Parkinson’s tremors to the point where they avoid eating out. I pass this link on to the occupational therapist I work with.


#6

What could possibly go wrong?


#7

I saw a GIF of someone using this last week and loved it. Having watched my grandfather struggle with Parkinson’s when I was a kid I can really appreciate how significant something like this could be for so many people.

What I really love is that it lets the person relax. They are no longer fighting their tremors so don’t get into that vicious feedback loop where they over-correct and it just gets worse and worse.


#8

It nice to see an article about a product that solves a real problem for the handicapped or elderly. Using technology to fix a problem brought on by disease and old age isn’t sexy but it comes across as being responsible and altruistic. We have enough first world gadgets, this actually could have a positive impact across all world levels.

When I first saw article headline I was imagining a ripley-vs-alien-queen contraption that would allow a chef to prep food during a 6.0 richter earthquake. “Watch as Tremor-correcting Ginsu cuts paper thin onion slices during a massive earthquake!”


#9

I think Cory meant it is based on technology used for optical image stabilization, not steadicam technology.


#10

I think he got it right the first time. The guy on the unicycle is your hand, and the camera is the end of the spoon:


#11

My father in law does a lot of photography; I wonder if this could be adapted to a camera mount.

As for teaching children basic coordination, this seems to be exactly the opposite of helpful; the kid would never have any reason to learn to control their motions, because the utensil would do it for them.


#12

I have a mild tremor and do a fair bit of photography. There are stabilized lenses, which are useful. These lenses are also all full-sized heavy lenses, which is annoying for transport, but a inherently an advantage for dealing with a tremor. With a full-size SLR, I can often get take a decent photograph with a one-eighth second exposure (sometimes) even without a stabilized lens. With a lighter camera, that doesn’t go so well.


#13

Came here to question that. I thought “steadicam technology” meant attaching your camera to a big damn weight?


#14

I wonder if this technology might be adapted to help surgeons perform extremely delicate incisions.


#15

It’s so awesome that instead of a link to the actual producer of the product, you’ve linked to a blurry small screen shot from the youtube video. Thanks!


#16

Notice how the screenshot has a play button in the middle of it? Click on it and the YouTube video will start playing.


#17

I’m not talking about that. Notice how there’s a link in the text below the video. A link in a context which we have become accustomed to believing will take us to the actual product or website. Note how if you click it you get a .jpg from the youtube site. But thank you for your valuable input!


closed #18

This topic was automatically closed after 5 days. New replies are no longer allowed.