Two female meth-heads kept a “special needs“ boy and his sister locked in cages


#1

[Read the post]


#2

I’m all for rehab. Maybe they wouldn’t have if they’d been clear headed and sober. However given my sister suffered permanent brain damage because of the neglect she suffered exasperating existing mental delays to the point she’s been seizure prone ever since she came into my family’s custody?

I am a little bit biased towards these people being made to somehow understand what they have done in way of harm to these children, and that no matter how well they might recover there will be lasting mental scars for the rest of their lives. I want to find the person that supplied them and force him through those kind of conditions. Alone, cut off from the world. Helpless and in the care of people who are only thinking of their next fix with not a regard in the world for their wellbeing.


#3

Universal Generalisations. Not even once.


#4

I know a few people who used to occasionally do meth (meth and crystal are the same thing, right? we just say meth when we don’t want it to sound cool?)

So far as I know, the worst thing it led to was partying when they should have been sleeping. And maybe some long term mood issues, but everyone’s got mood issues anyway, so it’s a little tricky to establish causation


#5

This being Georgia, the family situation is complex.

Yea, cages, methamphetamine, I would call that complex.


#6

You beat me to it, precisely what I was going to write…


#7

That was unnecessary, and I don’t even live in Georgia.

I live in the Bay Area; complex families are everywhere around me, whether it’s multi-generational step-families involving several absent fathers or same-sex couples raising foreign adopted children and sharing visitation rights with their former same- or opposite-sex spouses.

Meth is obviously also a problem in many regions, some quite near me.


#8

People should be prosecuted for their actions, in this case child abuse. People should not be put in jail for their drug use as that is a personal choice. The should be at least offered rehabilitation and counseling for their addictions.

That said, methamphetamines are quite safe when taken from legitimate drug sources. Look it up, amphetamines were prescribed for most of recent history for many different problems, and even our airmen still take it to fly for long hours.


#9

Oh, Xeni’s right. It’s fine to make generalizations about people for where they were born. It’s just like when you notice that all black people are criminals and no Asians can drive.

Although, I am amazed how far she reached on this one. The family situation is complex because her father was divorced twice? It’s the South, I was expecting her to say the caged 8-year-old was the older woman’s illegitimate aunt and half-sister.


#10

Interesting how drug use-abuse is decisively pardoned and the imprisonment of the children taken as secondary or tertiary concern.


#11

The film studios used to give it out so actors could work long hours filming.

And then we wondered what happened to the likes of Judy Garland and Elvis.

(Many others were fine. Why? To steal a scene from the show “Wilfred”, “Some people can’t handle Vegas.”)


#12

This. Sometimes family trees don’t fork so well…

Somewhere back on my mother’s side there are 1st and 3rd cousins who are married…


#13

A little off topic, but I learned from watching the British film, “How I live now”, that apparently kissing cousins are culturally, legally OK in the UK.

Evidently some king (EDIT: Henry VIII) really wanted to marry his cousin, so he changed the law.

It was an amusing moment in the film, since I had it on in the background and was half-watching it, and thought maybe I had missed something about who the male cousin was. “Wait, what? That can’t be right…” Ended up re-watching the start of the film 2-3 times before checking IMDB, wikipedia, etc.


#14

In addition to being insulting to the state of Georgia, you are wrong about blaming it on Meth. Here in Ohio in 2005 we had a couple that adopted or fostered 11 children and kept them in cages, no drugs involved. Abusive parents can live in any state, and most just think what they are doing is the way to parent.


#15

It is not so much the meth, which is bad for you, but not as bad as the popular weekend party drug ecstasy. The hard lifestyle and bad decisions(and degraded sanity) occur when someone makes a lifestyle of meth and often hard alcohol for everyday chronic go and stop chemicals is where everything goes wrong.


#16

Or someone could just come up with a TV show that essentially glamorizes the meth trade and then have them watch that.


#17

Except universal generalisations about universal generalisations, right?


#18

In engineering they are known as “rules of thumb”. Pretty damn useful, if you are aware of their limitations.


#19

Are you kidding? MDMA is a pretty safe drug, and even when it’s cut with dodgy stuff in the form of ecstasy pills, meth is far more dangerous. Not only in terms of immediate health problems, but in terms of long-term addiction and the behaviour that can drive.


#20

I think I just identified the downside of drugs that make you energetic, luckily I haven’t had to deal with kids in the past when I absolutely never did anything that made me really energetic but I can just picture the mental conditions of someone running at triple speed, compelled to do things, and with lowered ability to reason. That said I also dislike these people.