Universal's agents send Google a censorship demand for "127.0.0.1"


#1

Originally published at: http://boingboing.net/2015/07/23/universals-agents-send-googl.html


#2

This is fantastic and indicates the high quality of staff they have working on this issue.


#3

Just hope they never catch on to my favorite address for pirated stuff – localhost


#4

If Google actually responded to their request and took down the computer they are complaining about, it would be doing the world a favor.


#5

There, ftfy.


#6

They have top men working on this right now.
Top men.


#7

Not understanding this is directly analogous to not being able to find your own ass with both hands.

No, no it isn’t. This is rather specialized knowledge, which I did not have until today, and I expect very few people have. They can find their asses, I expect.


#8

It’s not that specialized. There’s a tshirt on thinkgeek thats says

“There’s no Place Like 127.0.0.1”


#9

Well could you help me find my ass then? I don’t think thinkgeek has it. At least, I hope not.


#10


#11

Right. Universal have now shown that they cannot be trusted to use this tool sensibly, therefore they should not be allowed to use it at all. Ever again.


#12

What I’m saying is that any technician or netadmin (probably one of the two set up the bot to go fishing for IPs) who doesn’t know about the localhost address is pretty much like a doctor who doesn’t know about bacteria, or a construction worker who doesn’t know about nails.

Better analogy: it’s like an electrician who doesn’t know the different wire gauges or conduit types they ostensibly work with every day. Joe average public might not know what wire guage to use for a 30 amp circuit in the kitchen, but the electrician should.


#13

Is this peak DMCA, or are we going to see the 192.168.x.x range blocked, too?


#14

You never forgot to filter out gathered results? :stuck_out_tongue:


#15

soooooo … if they think there is a pirate copy of their movie at 127.0.0.1 … doesn’t that indicate that they have someone pirating their movies from within their orgn …?


#16

Its entry level networking, you should reasonably be expected to know this if you’ve set up more than a few home networks or work with IP addresses all day.

Like @WearySky mentioned, it was probably automated and no human took a look at it.
Having said that, a human did set up the automation, that they didn’t think to validate for a valid public IP (The type your ISP would assign to you, the type that could ostensibly be used to tie a user to a download) tells you how little they know or care to check that their claims make sense.


#17

On the machine that’s being used to create these take down requests even!


#18

Sure I have. But I’d be pretty sure to double check if my work was going into what amounts to a court order.


#19

Easily, as that’s where their heads are up, presumably.


#20

Sites are definitely being blocked. I put my site on 10.1.1.14 and none of my friends can see it.