Unusual foods

They told you it was horse, but it was really Belgians.

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You can make an excellent pasta sauce with venison.
Most are a bit like a brown bolognese, with porcini.

Speaking of bolognese, the secret to a real (and really good) bolognese is carrots.

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I hope you manage to figure that out someday!

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I’m completely down with eating insects, but I think the Mexicans do it right, give it lots of spice and flavor, and all of a sudden it’s just another ingredient…

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I have no problem with it either. I don’t think it’s icky or anything, it’s just that none that I have tried have actually tasted good. Even with all the spices. I actually like the idea of fried insects, it sounds delicious in my head but always turns out disappointing.

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Battuto per sugo… almost any long cooking sauce will start with that trinity; onion, celery and carrots, chopped finely. I like to caramelize it, then add the sausage and fatty ground beef, get that browning, then the tomato, and then low and slow. BTW, just like a Texas chili, a good ragu is mostly meat (the original was made before the tomato arrived in Italy).

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I had similar in Taiwan. Six shots of wine, mixed with blood, bile, and other snake-liquids, then soup made with the snake meat. As with lots of these kinds of foods, it’s supposed to keep/make you virile.

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Didn’t have wine/drink, basically a soup with chunks of snake and a bit of pak choi, not really very much in the way of taste.

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Yep, venison was an occasional meal because we knew hunters. During my first marriage, my father-in-law hunted regularly, and I learned to cook with venison, because it subbed for other meats just fine & helped the food budget. Really bad red wine makes the best venison marinade, which was serendipitous, because the FIL made really bad, undrinkable, puckery sour, high proof wine, which he insisted on gifting us.

We had bear once, when I was a child, at a potluck thing - it tasted like beef stew.

Now, chitlins is another story. When I was working as a civil servant, I was one of three white women in our department. The other twenty were women of color, and some of them took orders for church lunches on Fridays. The woman across the aisle had chitlins one Friday, and I asked her about them. She had me taste them. They were chewy and kind of blah, but the chicken broth they were cooked in was delicious. I asked about ingredients (having learned on previous Fridays about greens and sweet potato pie, culinary delights I had never had before) and found out they were just intestines aka sausage casings. My dad was a Polish-American butcher, and one of the family stories is that they let me teethe on boiled sausage casings. So chitlins were actually my zweiback.

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Yeah. I wonder if they fry them italian style (like a fritto misto) if it might help, as there are a few styles of that where they fry, well fry… lots of tiny fish that there’s no point in deboning, so it’s crunchy in multiple senses. I was kinda underwhlemed by fried crickets, I think they just need some spice that people might be hesitant to use here.

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That is the America we are all striving for!

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I’m not sure whether this is worth taking seriously.

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My favorite insect eating experience was in college. We caught a bunch of Grasshoppers from the gardens, froze them (you put them in there live so they poop out all the poop. Seems kind of cruel now…), marinated in a soy sauce/garlic thing, then sautéed them in class. They tasted surprisingly like crawdads/crayfish.

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The Chinese restaurant near me serves “crispy fried pork intestines,” which is an amazing dish. The cooked intestines look like calamari, and have a very savory “dark” flavor. It’s also very spicy.

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In Chinatown I once asked what the section at the back of the menu that wasn’t translated into English was. The waitress said “intestines, you don’t want that” with such firmness that I moved on. I wish I hadn’t but it was Wong Kei, so, you know.

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@ Les_Pane
The Cathedral in Cusco, Peru has a painting of the Last Supper with Jesus and the Apostles chowing down on Guinea Pig

That’s exactly how they serve it today in Peru.

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I finally did it! I came to Sapporo and ate bear meat. It was… not good. Very gamey and chewy like leather. Smell can only be described as a bit off…

1925 yen.

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It looks like it was cooked pretty rare?

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Yeah, and they spent a good 20 minutes cooking it, too. The weird part thing, though, is that the parts that were more cooked were tougher and chewier than the raw parts on the inside…

I imagine it would make a decent bear jerky, though.

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I remember reading Karl May books as a child (highly problematic in hindsight, but that’s another story) and his native American characters would praise bear paw as a specialty but only if it has been left out for long enough that maggots appear and soften it. That always intrigued me even if it is probably made up by a German fraudster in prison who had never visited America at the time.

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