Watch a kid smash the Rubik's cube speed record


#1

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#2

I love the way all the communication in the room at that point is done almost entirely without language - lots of whooping, and everybody knows what has happened.


#3

Impressive!


#4

I love how the record-setter and a couple of the other kids are just absent-mindedly solving rubik’s cubes to calm themselves down toward the end of the video. Like Usain Bolt jogging around to calm down after a 100 meter dash.

Also, is there a standard method for scrambling a Rubik’s Cube before a competition run?


#5

Is it just me or does it seem like there are still a jumble of colors, and then in a split second its solved? I feel like if it were in a movie I’d have assumed it was special effects/editing.


#6

I was wondering this as well. I was even thinking that any speed record would have to be the average of 3 solves or something that reduces the differences in the random mixup.


#7

nerds !


#8

https://www.worldcubeassociation.org/regulations/#article-4-scrambling


#9

There are records for both single solve and average solve time (usually 3 tries)


#10

I’m impressed that this is so popular they have specialized commercially made competition timers just for the sport.


#11

Well, those mats are used for a number of dexterity and hand-based competitions, like cup stacking or even some trivia and paper/pencil puzzle competitions.


#12

I love those kids in that moment. It’s kind of a perfect moment.


#13

You got it, Those kids sharing that simple joy is a thing of wonder and beauty and the mix of kids sharing their fun and respect would be worth watching without ever knowing why. World leaders, co-workers, adults of any flavor pay attention to this these kids have something worth trying to recover for all adults.
On a totally different note wouldn’t it be wild to see an MRI, EEG or any other measure of that boys mind firing in action leading up to and including the resolution!


#14

What a nerd!

I’m kidding - this is amazing and wonderful. As someone old enough to have played with the cube in the early 80s and who picked it up again a couple years ago, I barely solve in under a minute.

Cube technology has advanced quite a bit in the intervening years. You can buy a “speed cube” for under $10 now.


#15

Yuup, yuup it would.


#16

I remember when I learned that there’s a (fairly) simple algorithm to solve the cube about a decade ago, my friends would be fascinated that I could solve it in less than 5 minutes. This kid is a whole different level of awesome.


#17

Then there is this guy, using them in an act, apparently using deft, one handed skills to transform the cubes in a magic act.


#18

At 0.25 percent speed it still looks fast, but almost reasonable.

Having watched it in slo-mo dozens of times now, I realize how perfect every move of every finger is. And he already puts his hands on the mat as gravity has barely even accelerated the falling cube.

Humans are amazing.


#19

Well that’s just bonkers.

Also, in the video, you can hear some kid saying what sounds like 2 world records were broken that day. I wonder what the other was.


#20

That’s kind of the way they work. You have to go “backwards” to move forward. They are indeed quite scrambled-looking just a few moves before they’re solved. But scrambled in a special way, such they come together quickly after that. Disclaimer: I’ve never been able to solve one. The apparent non-linear path to a solution just doesn’t gel in my brain.