Watch parachutist make an emergency landing in middle of an active soccer game

Originally published at: Watch parachutist make an emergency landing in middle of an active soccer game | Boing Boing

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I think the yellow card was a joke, the Polish FA don’t have any authority over parachutists.

It’s been a while since there have been any new You Are The Ref articles, but I think the actual decision should be a drop ball

The following are the situations in which the 2020 Laws of the Game specify that play should be restarted with a dropped ball:

  • the crossbar becomes displaced or broken[5]:40
  • the ball becomes defective[5]:46
  • an outside agent enters the field of play[5]:53
  • a player suffers a serious injury, unless the injury was caused by an offence[5]:67
  • a spectator blows a whistle which interferes with play[5]:67
  • an extra ball, other object or animal enters the field of play and interferes with play[5]:68
  • the referee signals a goal before the ball has passed wholly over the goal line[5]:93
  • a player commits a physical offence inside the field of play against any person other than a player, team official or match official[5]:114–115
  • after a penalty kick has been taken, the ball rebounds into the field of play from the goalkeeper, crossbar or goalposts and is then touched by an outside agent[5]:125–126
  • the ball touches a match official, remains on the field of play, and one of the following occurs:[5]:91
    • a team starts a promising attack
    • the ball goes directly into the goal
    • the team in possession of the ball changes
  • the referee stops play for any other reason for which the Laws do not define the method of restart[5]:87.
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Great quick thinking and level headedness by both the skydiver and the ref. The yellow card is the icing on the cake.

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Better than landing in a pond filled with alligators:
image

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The skydiver certainly took his time about deciding that his main chute was fouled, especially over a populated area. I’d give him a yellow card for that.

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That type of twisting is repairable event. Malfunctions other than this one (eg “streamers”), yes, could necessitate immediate jettison of the main chute and going to the back-up chute.

As an Internet-certified master parachute instructor, with 200+ simulated jumps to my name, I can stipulate that he took the correct amount of time.

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Also…

a referee gave him a yellow flag.

It is THE referee (unlike unruly US sports, we only need one referee on the pitch per football game) and it is a yellow CARD.

And @the_borderer - you are perfectly correct about the drop ball decision. It’s a shame there’s no video to show us what his decision actually was.

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There used to be more than one referee in the 1860s, each team had their own and no-one would abuse that because it was bad sportsmanship and the players were gentlemen.

You can probably guess how well that worked in reality.

Other than that, the linesmen/women and fourth official are assistant referees and will take over if the referee is injured. I think there is also a standby referee now, but there are pictures of Jimmy Hill being a linesman in a league match because he was the only qualified person in the crowd.

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Video link for the BBS



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wY8IzbCotOk

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Again, you are entirely correct (and provide useful insight and education to those less aware of the intricacies of the beautiful game). :wink:

Which is why I said ‘on the pitch’ knowing that someone would note that linesmen (or women) are today called assistant referees (they would perhaps be linespersons if we had not moved to assistant referees). But they are still ‘assistant referees’ not ‘the referee’ and are rarely on the pitch itself (the pitch being the field of play rather than the entire venue).

the linesmen/women and fourth official are assistant referees and will take over if the referee is injured

You could say that one of them would be parachuted in if the referee was unable to continue for any reason.

(I’d get my coat but it is currently being used as one of the goalposts - along with my jumper.)

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Chinny reckon.

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Card/flag debate, and nobody is complaining about the patch being called a “football” field?

Shame on you.

We used to call that “Saturday afternoon” back when I lived in FL.

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Fun fact: lots of places call their game “football” (Britain and most of the world, Ireland, and Oz - different games and ones that you can handle the ball, and the US most oddly).

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Britain had a fight between three football codes though (Association, Rugby Union and Rugby League). It might explain why a lot of British fans get so defensive when people say soccer.

The class implications are also relevant (Soccer is public school slang, like rugger)

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Needless to say none of that is news to me. Being urban Irish football is “soccer” and what our parents and country cousins called football was “GAA” to me. As a northsider we didn’t have hurling back then. Australians call them all - Ozzie rules, league and union, “footy” which is fun. Wouldn’t be surprised if they did all four now football has become more popular and successful there. I thinks it’s union that has made way in popularity.

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I’d never knew “the Beautiful Game” was a byname for Sky Diving.

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Well, it’s about to be filled with alligators…

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It looked like he spent the time trying to control the chute despite the tangled lines, but having no luck.

It takes a certain amount of trust to cut away a parachute that is still functioning at least well enough for you to survive the trip all the way down to the ground, even though you have no control over what kind of lethal shit you may drop yourself onto. At that point my mind would probably be panicking “OK, that first chute was a tangled mess, what if my backup chute is packed even worse?!?” It’s hard to say how rational I’d be in a stressful situation like that.

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It’s true that I’m playing armchair skydiver here, as I would never subject myself to that sort of adventure. But I worked closely for many years with a world-class skydiver, so I learned a bit about the philosophy.
His rule #1: Pack your own chutes, so you will know how badly they’re packed.