Watch woman release bobcat from a foothold trap

Originally published at: Watch woman release bobcat from a foothold trap | Boing Boing

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I’d want a bigger shield (and a fresh pair of pants).

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What is the thinking behind a trap that doesn’t cause injury? Is it supposed to be less cruel? Is it to protect humans/pets rather than game? Are they legally mandated?

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Possibly to protect the integrity of the prospective merchandise?

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Starving an animal to death is disgusting, I’d better not find someone setting one of those on the trails, damn it.

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This recently passed here and I am very relieved.

There should be no trapping on public land anywhere.

I can understand humane traps to relocate animals away from private property.

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As the second video explains, she sets the traps herself, and they are designed so that she can release unwanted prey without hurting them. That’s why she had a special shield just for that purpose.

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I’d like to raise a hand and request that the initial image on a post not be a screenshot of the video which includes the “Play” button and associated youtube watermarks - if only to try and save my sanity whenever I try to click on the first damn picture and realise it’s just a snap!

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Have you never done the prank where you take a screen dump with only the icons, then you use that as the background image while moving all the real icons into a corner?

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Cheeky…

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I love that prank! My best workplace prank was during the 2017 Wannacry ransomware outbreak, I set my Windows lock screen to the ransomware’s lock screen. I then went for lunch. I work in infosec and we’d been battling the issue all day, so it went really, really well. :smiley:

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She seems to be a responsible trapper, that’s great. Unfortunately not all leg hold traps are so benign nor are the people placing them so responsible.

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I think if she finds the prey she is hunting in her traps, she kills it. If she’s maintaining her traps, they aren’t dying of hunger.

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That right there is the issue, not all are out everyday to check, and the animal is vulnerable to other predators, in the heat of Summer will die of dehydration quickly, and or is left to fend against stupid humans.

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If I were to come across these traps in the wild, I would disable it and take it with me so as to find the owner of this lost piece of equipment. I’m sure I never would. Sorry, Skye, hope they’re not that expensive!

I came back from a run, once, and found a bird caught by its leg in a rat trap. It was trying to wiggle its way out, and it was in the middle of a suburban street. There was a neighborhood cat stalking it. I released the bird after chasing the cat away, it hung out for a few seconds before flying away, but I feared that its twig like leg was broken.

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This. No spoilage before you check your trap line. Captured animals get to suffer until the trapper comes by and dispatches them. Gotta love humans…

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I’m questioning why she is trapping for coyotes at all. They are a predators, but that’s what they do. (So are bobcats, wolves …) I don’t understand what’s going on.

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Yep, me neither.

She traps them for their fur/pelts. She’s actually part of an association for trappers and is an educator for it. She mentions in the video notes that she had already trapped as many bobcats as she was allowed and the season had just ended, so she set that one free.

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