Welsh government responds in Klingon to UFO questions


#1

[Read the post]


#2

Are you sure that isn’t just Welsh?


#3

enter link description here


#4

The ease of pronunciation gives it away every time, definitely Klingon.


#5

Beat me to it, dammit.


#6

Welsh is more similar to Old Enochian


#7

Ah, those Welsh. Gotta raise a glass for their grace under (linguistic) pressure.

Almost seven trips around the sun ago was this gem, and it’s still one of my faves:


#8

Quick question about the gif: Isn’t the “Klingon” in the gif technically a “Black-Face” character and a big No-No in the US?


#9

Too many vowels.


#10

1960s…

Besides, Star Trek covereth a multitude of sins (or not covereth in the case of the TOS women’s miniskirt)…


#11

Quick mod note: Stay on topic


#12

Welsh has seven vowels in comparison to English, which only has five. In the Welsh language, W and Y are also vowels.

But sure. Let’s keep up with the same jokes about the Welsh language again and again.


#13

I apologize. I was not aware of the Welsh use of “w” as a vowel. I’ve just run across so many Welsh words that appear to be unpronounceable - this makes a lot more sense now.
Thank you for the information.
Would a more apt response be "Not enough use of the letter “w?”


#14

I’m thinking there’s probably more people in the world who speak Klingon than Welsh.


#15

740,000 Welsh speakers vs about a dozen Klingon speakers. As far as I know there are no Klingons on Earth, so Welsh has it beaten as a first language too.


#16

There’s even more Cornish speakers than Klingon.

I really should have tried to learn Cornish or Welsh. I blame my parents for moving. But if they hadn’t I guess I wouldn’t exist…


#17

There’s more Manx speakers too. Klingon is probably about equal with Cumbric speakers. There was a recent attempt at reviving Cumbric, like Manx and Cornish, but there wasn’t much interest as no-one has spoken it for at least 700 years.


#18

‘Y’ is a vowel as well as a consonant in English (e.g. ‘only’). ‘W’ plays the part of a vowel in several diphthongs (e.g. ‘own’).


#19

Yeah, I know. English is my first language. It’s just that, unlike English, Y and W are ALWAYS vowels in Welsh. And are the reason why so many people make fun of Welsh for not having any vowels because English normally classes those two letters as consonants. (Welsh isn’t exactly my second language, but I’ve lived in North Wales for nearly eleven years and I’ve taken a lot of classes on the language. The jokes stop being funny real quick.)


#20

Really? Isn’t ‘W’ consonantal in words like gwyn? Or is that actually pronounced something like goo-in?

(Genuine question, not trolling.)