25 years ago, a mutant American crayfish turned to asexual reproduction, and all of Europe's lakes are filling up with its clones


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2018/02/07/pincer-maneuver.html


#2

someone really needs to create an invasive species “guilt-free” cookbook with recipes for Caribbean lionfish, American kudzu, English Japanese knotweed, Australian rabbits and European marbled crayfish.

Good luck coming up with a recipe for making Cane Toads palatable.


#3

I saw a program on that, actually. The problem isn’t that they are unpalatable, it’s that they are poisonous and require careful preparation to avoid/break down the toxins.


#4

The Japanese have been eating Kudzu for centuries.


#5

The good news is that native fish species are going to start gobbling these guys up. Even more herbivorous fish like carp love a good crayfish, to say nothing of predators. Crayfish make stellar bait for so many kinds of fish.


#6

I can say crayfish are delicious, especially if you have a Cajun cookbook.

But here’s a question: does asexual reproduction make them more prolific? There are plenty of prolific creatures that do it the old-fashioned way.


#7

Very tasty, I have eaten them many times.


#8

We need to send some mutant Cajuns (start with Gambit?) overseas, hope that in a few years they start to asexually reproduce, and start crawfish boils all the world


#9

That sounds like quite an opportunity for diseases and parasites. Once they solve the defenses of one crayfish, they’ve cracked them all.


#10

Geneticists and biologists also reassure us that cloning is only a good short term strategy for reproduction, and in 100,000 years or so, Mother Nature will rid us of the clones

Well, we’re fine then, why bother…


#11

“Mmmhmm, I tell you what, me and my pappy, and some of my boys - we come down there and we fix your crawfish problem, I gar-un-tee. Make up some crawfish jambalya. Put some meat on your bones!” - The answer from just about every Creole in Louisiana.


#12

I’d guess twice as prolific, since all, rather than half, the population can reproduce.


#13


#14

And then they’ll argue for hours over whether it’s important to salt the rinse, and when to start the lagniappe so the corn comes out at the same time as the mudbugs.

Good times! Boil 'em up and I’ll eat 'em!


#15

Plus the partner doesn’t have a headache or just isn’t in the mood


#16

Was hoping for a worthier title:

“Trump-lovin’ crayfish can go f*ck themselves.”


#17

It makes them more invasive, because one individual can start a new population.


#18

Learn to swim :white_check_mark:
Fuck L Ron Crayfish, and fuck all his clones :question: No need


#19

There are several lionfish cookbooks out there. Here’s one:
http://www.reef.org/enews/articles/reef-releases-lionfish-cookbook


#20

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_3NjYhgg-qQ

(I had that actor once as a teacher in a trial advocacy / public speaking sort of thing – he (and his lovely wife!) were just absolutely brilliant instructors)