Attempt to make Turkish coffee in tiny sauce pot ends in failure

This is the point in this conversation where I am required by cultural law to make weak arguments that “Actually it was the Greeks” but we all know that’s a lie. Sigh.

4 Likes

I’d say it was too wide, so more water evaporated than it should, and the top parts of it was hotter than it should be. Normally it would brew from the bottom while the top is relatively cooler, and needs to be taken off the heat the moment boiling is about to start. Brewing coffee for 1-2 people in a pot like that is too little. Maybe for 8-10 people it would’ve worked better? Still, for example when brewing coffee for a lot of people, a cezve (ibrik) for 3-4 people is used and brewed in batches so I’d say the process isn’t very scalable for some reason.

12 Likes

Coffee grows neither in Turkey nor in Greece, so we (Turks, Greeks, Armenians, Serbs and others) imported the thing from Yemen and drank it. When the empire divorced, everybody took home all the recipes so the fights over what is whose are mostly moot, but still kinda fun :slight_smile:

15 Likes

My usual source for useful information like this didn’t yield much. Only:

where the answers are not really providing much insight.

4 Likes

Yeah, coffee is Yemeni, but is Turkish coffee properly “Turkish coffee” or “Greek coffee”?

(It’s almost definitely not originally Greek coffee since the Greeks call the cezve a “briki”, which is cognate to ibrik – which comes from Arabic. So maybe it’s actually “Arabic coffee”?)

5 Likes

Here you go

Here you go

6 Likes

thanks :slight_smile:

6 Likes

I purchased a stainless one earlier this year after using a small teflon ‘egg pot’ for a while. I think the differences are minor, but here are my observations:

  1. Most/all copper/bronze cevke’s you can purchase are nickel or stainless inside; I think that maybe copper will corrode or make the coffee taste bad, so it isn’t the copper (I thought this might be the case too until I bought one).
  2. the foam comes from the edges. The side gets hot and boils and you can see the crema move in from the outside; at least if you use a slow heat. Larger pots have more surface area as a ratio of their sides, so less crema
  3. The slanted edge helps in pouring a little. You can more easily leave some of the grounds in the pot when you have the slant.
  4. Pouring into a small cup is much easier with the turkish pot versus a normal pot, because of the lip.
  5. At least for me, I really doubt there is anything about retaining the air in the width;
    After seeing a lot of complaints about some of the more ornate ones online, I got a modern stainless utililitarian one below and am happy with it:
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B082WS14MB/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o08_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1
5 Likes

Veering off topic for a sec:

I was curious about this so i looked it up and the usage of the word to describe those kinds of windows has been in use since at least the 1700’s in France. The general thought is that it does have a connection to German but there isn’t a definitive proof or link

10 Likes

Wow! Mind blown!

6 Likes

The Omanis and various other arabs do much the same thing in a differently shaped pot:

As do the Ethiopians and Eritreans in another shape of pot:

which is probably where and why everyone else got the general idea from.

8 Likes

I’m always inherently skeptical of these sorts of “cross-language confusion” etymologies since they are too cute by half and also too recurrent in other terms (see “kangaroo”, “Nome, Alaska”, others) – exactly the sort of qualities we see in false armchair etymologies all the time. Seems like it would be hard to prove etymologically, unfortunately (but possibly easy to disprove with appropriate evidence…).

5 Likes

The traditional recipe for baking (yes, baking) coffee in cezve is probably relevant. Note that my information comes via Bosnia, but also note that coffee on Baščaršija in Sarajevo is every bit as good as any I’ve tried in Turkey.

To make traditional Bosnian coffee, start with beans that are fairly lightly roasted. Grind them fine in a brass hand-grinder, then dry roast a spoonfull in the tiny one-serving đezva (Bosnian version of the word cezve). Meanwhile, heat water separately in a kettle. When your grounds are roasted to the proper color, pour boiling water into the đezva. Serve with rahatluk and a glass of water.

A few caveats if you’re tempted to try it. First, freshly ground coffee hasn’t degassed yet, so expect a lot of foam. The foam contains some grounds, so it’s not really the equivalent of espresso crema. On the other hand, the beans must be ground extremely fine, so you won’t get back specks between your teeth.

Second: the grounds being practically dust, they are an extremely efficient heat insulator. Apply heat carefully and shake often, or you’ll burn the bottom layer to carbon. Trust me on this.

Third, pour water in the thinnest of streams. You are pouring boiling water into insulating superheated dust. Do it too quickly and the contents of your cezve will end up on your kitchen ceiling. Trust me on this too.

Finally, the brass grinder isn’t mandatory. It isn’t even very practical. But it looks nice.

So, my take on the traditional form: you need a wide bottom for roasting the grinds, a material-copper-that dissipates heat quickly during the pour, and a shape that keeps the coffee contained in those critical few seconds. And, of course, the hand-beaten copper looks good when serving.

Of course, I could be completely wrong.

20 Likes

That is the most dangerous, explodey way of making coffee I’ve ever heard of. I love it.

12 Likes

Welcome to BBS, friend!

8 Likes

expect no less than this from balkans, eastern mediterranean or caucaus :smiley:

6 Likes

Best ‘splainer! Saved us video of the tiny pot goin’ sidewise.

5 Likes

And the Yemenites got it from Ethiopia where it originates.

6 Likes

The English interpretation of ‘ibrik’ may be via the Greek word for a similar vessel, the Briki. I leave it to the respective Greeks and Turks on here to (hopefully not) go to war over which is better.

image

5 Likes

We had a Turkish guy on our team at work and he would make us all Turkish coffee sometimes. It was amazing. Talk about strong though, a few sips was like 5 cups of the weak drip coffee I’m used to! :grin:

6 Likes