CDC: don't eat romaine lettuce


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2018/11/21/cdc-dont-eat-romaine-lettuc.html


#2

Are you or someone you love taking salad? Salad: not even once.


#3

Seriously though, how does the country’s entire supply of romaine get contaminated?


#4

I started growing my own romaine each summer 2 years ago and never buy it in the store anymore.


#5

If Romani Lettuce settles down, does it cease to be Romani?


#6

Guess what I bought yesterday, just before the alert went out?

Maybe I should feed it to the rabbits, there are a lot of them this year.


#7

And why does it take them so long to narrow down the source? It’s almost like someone defunded the part of government in charge of stuff like that. But that’s crazy talk!

Good thing blockchains will save us!


#8

Seems to me if you cook your lettuce long enough that will kill the E. Coli.

What? We cook cabbage, why not lettuce?


#9

You say E Coli, I say extra protein.


#10

Might as well cook Romaine or iceberg lettuce. It’s not like they are there for the taste is it?

Cook them, then throw them out.


#11

Actually…a warm pea salad is a regular on our dinner menu.

brown some pancetta, remove and add chicken sock and reduce. Drop in some fresh peas and cook gently. once ready shred some romaine lettuce on top and cover…remove from the heat. allow the lettuce to wilt (about 1-2 min max). Then toss the pancetta back in and serve.

It’s quite delicious. As is grilled romaine lettuce with a red wine reduction and a hearty cheese like a gruyere.


#12

I don’t think the whole supply is contaminated. It’s just that they don’t know what is and where the contamination is coming from. And if you can’t tell which ones are safe, best to avoid them all.

Grilled romaine is awesome. Particularly as a warm ceasar salad.


#13

Those sound delicious, and now I need an early lunch.

But, I’m not sure that’s going to be enough cooking to kill off E Coli.

I’m not sure how much cooking romaine lettuce would need, temperature or time, but I’m guessing it’s well beyond a quick trip to the grill for a char and more like a mush. Which is to bad.


#14

and you mocked and shamed the president for not eating his greens. well who’s laughing now liberals?

(His cardiologist)


#15

It’s contaminated with E. coli, not myxomatosis.


#16

Oh, it definitely isn’t. Just replying to the notion that most people have that lettuce is never “cooked”.


#17

As mentioned elsewhere, it’s not necessarily the entire supply - but it MIGHT be a large proportion. Last time around (it was only as far back as June!), it was traced to a farm in the Yuma Valley (where, it turns out, the majority of the country’s romaine is grown) whose water comes from a canal that runs past sheep pasture.

There was some discussion back then about, maybe, considering the safety of industrial agriculture and industrial sheep farming being so close together; I don’t know whether anything came of that discussion. If this turns out to have come from the same area, that particular problem may solve itself.


#18

I’m eating the romaine lettuce out of my garden as I have been.


#19

(JK, salad’s great.)


#20

What? Did you think I meant to harm the little fluffy bunnies?!

No, I want to feed them the lettuce so that they have thick shiny coats … and the owls will pick them off.

(Last winter they ate some shrubs. Not just the leaves, but the wood too!)