Goblies: hand thrown paintballs


#1

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#2

In paintball, these would be called ‘grenades’


#3

Very cool.

N.B.: Not high school, Leiheigh University.


#4

Sounds like a parent’s nightmare! I like it. Of course I also liked Jarts.


#5

Powdered dyes may be food-safe, but are they OK to be aerosolized and potentially inhaled?


#6

It’s not really a powder, more a slurry.

My bet is that the thing is leveraging the gel formation used in “caviar” production in molecular cuisine - the interaction of calcium ions and sodium alginate.
http://www.molecularrecipes.com/spherification/reverse-spherification/

The process of the making of the spheres is not shown, but my guess is that a gel of the paint is placed into liquid-permeable moulds, which then are immersed in a solution. Likely the gel is sodium alginate based, and the solution for immersion is based on a calcium salt.

Edit: It may also be the other way. The gel in the slurry may be of a different nature, and the limmersion liquid can be alginate-based. But then it would be somewhat thick and wouldn’t penetrate so readily through the mould so the method would have to be somewhat different to what I proposed. But another method would then be possible - injecting the slurry into the viscous liquid by a syringe, and then straining the resulting balls.


#7

You look great in those jorts.


#8

Is this all that different from the paintballs seen in 10 Things I Hate About You?


#9

I’m a little surprised this hasn’t been done before, given the existence of such events as http://www.runordye.com/ .


#10

Ya might want to check out the dye before starting the run…
Color Run dye leaves its mark on joggers’ hair - NL Times
I guess that the dye they used was a bit persistent – lots-o-colorful-blondies in Holland the past few days.


More pics at the facebrick site: Crazy Colorrun Leeuwarden


#11

That was the first thing that came to mind for me as well.

From the movie, I assumed this was a common thing at fetes or carnivals in the USA. I guess not?


#12

That scene popped into my head too.


#13

We used to do something kinda similar in high school. Basically capture the flag but instead of tagging people, “flour bombs”. Little satchets of about 2T of flour in a rubber banded single thickness napkin. Heavy enough to throw nicely. Not heavy enough to hurt. Giant “POOF” when you got hit (there was no denying it). For added bonus play at night…

A big plus was no dye. No wetness or ruined clothes. Just a good de-dusting required after play.


#14

Paintball grenades are rubberband-powered and spray paint from their reservoir in a roughly circular pattern as the highly twisted rubber band relaxes.

These are more like “paintball shuriken”.


#15

The first person to take a hit to the eye will sue this company out of existence.


#16

The first person to take a hit to the eye will sue this company out of existence.

I hope you’re wrong. After all, paintball gun companies have managed to survive just fine, and are of course infinitely more dangerous than these… Hell, a tennis ball is more dangerous than these are.


#17

We used to use chalk dust (probably made from the stolen chalk of the few remaining old fashioned blackboards our school hadn’t yet replaced with dry erase whiteboards at the time), but it was pretty much the same idea as your flour bombs and any lingering signs would also come out with a brush and a wash with no staining.


#18

Ah young mouse… I could tell tales of pranks done by hiding small pieces of chalk in the erasers, or of the sheer joy of being the one chosen to give yourself silicosis by being the child allowed to go outside to clean erasers by smacking them together…

But yeah, some kids nowadays have what I understand are basically giant touchscreen digital boards…

Maybe that’s why they need giant wet paintballs. Choking on dust ain’t good enough for the likes of them! Why in my day…

(as I need to take a sit in my walker for a brief spell…snoooooree…)


#19

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