Guy goes urban spelunking, finds fully stocked underground safe house


#21

Doesn’t look like either a bomb shelter or safe house. I didn’t see food or beds, both of which you’d think would be a necessary feature for either of those setups.


#22

That’s impossible! There’s nothing beneath Trump.


#23

Yeah, 100% fake, he goes “straight to the goods” everytime instead of meandering around, having to search for things, etc. It’s almost as if, oh, I dunno, it’s been totally scripted.


#24

But…


#25

There’s a “15 minutes later” card after he opens the door. At that point all the lights are on and he takes us through the place. I just figured he went through the place off camera, including the finding of the light switches. Then once he had explored the space, he took the camera through and “showed” us everything he had found.


#26

This has to be a teaser for a movie or video game.


#27

Apart from … it’s Russians all the way down.


#28

Why would you go to the effort of building and stockpiling an underground urban shelter and make the door so simple to open? I spent more time trying to solve the babel fish puzzle than this guy did opening that door.


#29

I kept waiting for the jump scare. Maybe a gaunt figure wearing a shabby coat, rubber boots, and gas mask raising a crowbar just before the video abruptly ends.


#30

FYI to editors, broken blockquote tag in original article, at least as I’m seeing it.


#31

Moreover, why would you design the door to lock people in? It’s not a prison or a safehouse, not with all those museum displays. My money’s on bullshit.


#32

The guy’s youtube channel has him exploring other Soviet “bunkers” - or it could very well be the same one. It seems clear that he is filming and editing these for effect and they aren’t just raw video of what he finds. I would doubt that the way he went into this one is the main entrance. He probably just went into some accessway for dramatic effect.

I would much rather have straightforward narration of what he found than the music from STALKER playing over things.


#33

It is a bomb shelter. This one is Soviet, but they used to be everywhere. If you look for this sign-


You might be able to go into the basement and find where one used to be. There are still some that have been forgotten or at least ignored.
You can learn all about them here- http://www.civildefensemuseum.com/index.html

But they are discovered regularly.



#34

My high school had one. They’re all over the place.


#35

There are three levers on the outside, and three levers on the inside.


#36

Lithuania


#37

Thank you very much.


#38

This reminds me of the old FMC Corporation factory buildings in San Jose where the Bradley Fighting Vehicles were built. So, FMC moved out and sold the property to the redevelopment district, which in turn leased it to the San Jose Earthquakes for a new soccer stadium. So the Earthquakes promptly demolished the factory buildings and started grading the property to prep it for their new stadium… and hit a bunker. A bunker not on any building plan or documented anywhere, full of scrap parts and other junk. So they had to dig out that bunker and fill in the hole to have a good foundation for their stadium, and they kept grading some more and hit… ANOTHER bunker. And again. And again. And again. Until finally they ran into a bunker that was full of explosive shells. Luckily they turned out to be shells that degraded with age rather than become more unstable with age, but there was an iffy few minutes there where the grading crew wasn’t sure whether they were about to be blown to kingdom come or not.

It turned out that all these bunkers had been built as fallout shelters back during the Cold War and weren’t on any plans or permits because they were classified Top Secret as a place for the factory workers to run to when the Big One happened, and then presumably the factory workers would then exit and resume building fighting vehicles. When the Cold War wound down, FMC line workers used them for random storage of stuff that they didn’t want to throw away but didn’t want to clutter the factory floor with either, until finally FMC shut down the San Jose plant altogether and anybody who knew about the bunkers was no longer with the company. I can imagine though that an urban spelunker in the years between when FMC shut down and when the plant was demolished would have had fun times exploring all these bunkers underneath a factory building…


#39

Under Mar-a-Lago or Trump Tower?


#40

The “Fallout Shelter This Way” sign in one of the buildings at Berkeley (in late 70s) still referred to CONELRAD (predecessor to the Emergency Broadcast Network).

In the early 80s, when I was shopping for a house in New Jersey, one place that we looked at had a bomb shelter. The house was built on a steep hillside that went down to the local swamp, and the bomb shelter was mainly there because they needed another floor there for the foundations anyway. The top floor was at street level, first floor down was full-sized with a balcony over the swamp and fixed up as a living area, next one down was smaller and mainly storage, then the bomb shelter level (used as a wine cellar), then the bottom one which was open for occasionally flooding.