I found a locked safe hidden at the back of a closet in my new house


#3099

I seldom do. But I treat the things as a snack, mostly eat them around midnight.


#3100

They’re made of plastic – just a tag-out lock. They’ve got a great core, though. Better than just about any other Master lock.


#3101

Kind of disappointing its plastic but considering these are for tag-outs i suppose that makes sense. What do you use yours for?


#3102

I just try to pick it. I have two, keyed alike, and one I can pick after some groping around, and the other one has so far defeated me. It doesn’t make much sense.


#3103

#3104

Yikes!


#3105

Fun fact: an anagram of “yikes” is “key is”! The key is what, I wonder.

(just trying to bring this back around to safes for old time’s sake.)


#3106

I was going to say that most sake isn’t aged beyond six months, and is drunk within a year :wink: …but today I learned that a small percentage of sake on the market is aged, some of it for a number of years. Apparently some of it may taste similar to sherry, or bourbon, or whiskey.

Therefore I think it’s safe to say: while one may have some understanding of a subject, never assume you have a lock on it.

(And seriously, don’t humans age—or attempt to age, or age by accident—pretty much all foods? I should have known there would be aged sake! I suppose I vaguely guessed there would be, or I wouldn’t have gone looking it up.)


#3107

Wonderful things like beer and cheese would probably not exist if not for some neolithic happy accident. Hurrah for absentmindedness.


#3108

And for having enough to eat that some can be set aside for later…in a safe place, of course.


#3109

The other day I learned that oaks have a three-year cycle for acorn production: two lean years followed by a boom year. The two lean years keep the nut forager population in check; the boom year causes squirrels to go nuts (ha) with hoarding, collecting and hiding so many nuts that they forget about a large number of them. If the oaks always had lean years this distribution wouldn’t happen; if they were always heavy producers the forager population would boom and all the nuts would get eaten too.


#3110

The squirrels are probably hoping for some nice fermented acorns…imagine their surprise to find that they’ve got a bunch of little trees instead.