ICE and Florida Sheriff try their hardest to deport man born in Philadelphia


#41

Carrillo’s arrest highlights pitfalls in ICE’s digitally driven search for the deportable. At the core of the hunt are massive federal databases containing records on citizenship, crime, foreign travel, education and work.

I’m guessing that they also have a statistics based management system, where people have a quota to meet every week, and are expected to increase it over the previous week. (They might not call it a quota, “job performance index” or something, but it amounts to the same.)


#42

Still a person of color though.


#43

New physicians are told “Make a diagnosis and stick with it.”
It looks like the police have a similar maxim “Find a Black suspect and convict him no matter what.”


#44

Also from the complaint:

[The detainer request] contained a number of discrepancies: It indicated that Mr. Brown was 7 feet tall when, in reality, he is 5 feet, 7 inches tall

(!)


#45

Not that I disagree with you here in general but in this case ICE were the ones who did take his claim seriously and released him.

They were of course also the ones who asked the Sheriff’s department to hold him based on wrong information in the first place but it’s the Sheriff’s department that:

a) agreed to hold him - they’re under no obligation to accede to ICE requests and
b) insisted on keeping him in jail despite his claims to be a US citizen.

They told him they weren’t interested and he needed to sort that out with ICE.

And that’s where this:

becomes relevant since the only way for an inmate to contact ICE about a detainer is apparently via an understaffed hotline where if the inmate somehow manages to stay on the phone for more than an hour waiting, they get to speak to someone who has no authority to do anything about the detainer whatsoever.

That is of course the result of deliberate decisions to fund the driving around in vans, rounding people up and locking them up parts of the system as opposed to the sorting out cock-ups bit of the system.

The Sheriff also gets $50 per inmate detained on ICE’s request which seems an utterly pointless figure given what it must cost to keep people locked up.


#46

No. No, they did not. That’s the point.


#47

First they came for the Hispanics, but I was not Hispanic so I said nothing…

How long until they get to us white folks who just don’t toe the line on the multi-phobic, ethnic cleansing assholery? I suspect not all that long. Opposing their stupid will be considered “a threat to public order.” Heil!


#48

Until we can get past the “thin blue line” mentality that any wholly justified exercise of oversight on a corrupt or unnecessarily violent police officer is the equivalent of an unjustified and wanton attack on all cops everywhere, most district attorneys will be understandably reluctant to go after cops, because they need to work closely with cops in order to do their own jobs.


#49

For that, you have to get people to care about voting for DAs they like and selecting against those they don’t like. Part of the problem is that people don’t understand the legal process. Right now, people tend to blame sherriff departments for things that DAs are often ultimately responsible for, like whether or not someone is charged with a crime.


#50

Yeah. Pretty sure Kafka wrote it.


#51

So… that makes it “okay” somehow? And like Chuck said, it’s STILL a person of color.

O_O


#52

“You want sanctuary cities? Because this is how you get sanctuary cities!” /s


#53

Are you sure Florida Man doesn’t work for the ICE?


#54

Bingo! (and extra stuff to make this post over 9 characters)


#55

If we have to depend on Joe average citizen to be 1) intelligent and 2) empathetic and motivated enough to care… We’re screwed.


#57

Ha, ha, ha. NO. But the bright side is that the IRS is now too underfunded to conduct audits, so you’ll probably get away with it.


#58

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