Juicero spotted on slightly dirty thrift shore shelf


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2018/03/06/juicero-selling-for-400-a-ye.html


#2

One of these thrift stores should set aside a space as a “Museum of Techbro Failure” to bring in the tourists.


#3

I suppose one could break it down for parts? There must be, what, ten bucks worth in there?


#4

Maybe there is some piece of it that could be repurposed.

Anyway, about “raw water” From what I know, in Italy bottled water is raw water from a spring, and by law a water bottle factory have to check the bottled water for sanity and leave some water of the spring for public free access and eventually part of the water goes in the public water system. Like the Pian della Mussa springs for Turin.


#5

Fun teardown video.

TLDW version: It’s spectacularly and expensively over built.


#6

I wonder what value – if any – was claimed by the person who donated the juicer. The Salvation Army valuation guide doesn’t list juicers.


#7

“I mean, it’s one banana Juicero, Michael… What could it cost? Ten dollars?”


#8

So much of the expense was that it was totally overbuilt with totally unnecessarily expensive manufacturing techniques. The bits that are actually reusable are, what, a couple motors?


#9

Is it overbuilt tough enough that one could do a poor man’s Hydraulic Press Channel?


#10

in the goodwill with the busted keyboards and crusty printers

And breadmakers. Where do thrift stores get all their breadmakers? Do they sell them and get restocked, or is it always the same dead-enders? I finally broke down and bought one (because hey, 4.99!) but used it for nothing but occupying space in my kitchen, until I finally donated it to a thrift store.


#11

damn, the photo made me actually anthropomorphosad. I kinda want to see an updated Brave Little Toaster where they rescue this guy, then help him gracefully deal with the downfall from believing he was the next greatest thing to realizing he was an over-hyped vaporware VC cash-grab…

brave%20litle%20juicero


#12

“Will it Juice?” you tube?


#13

I use mine (an Oster; you’ve probably seen the model at Goodwill many times) several times a year. Sometimes it is fun to have nice big slices of breakfast bread. My sister uses hers most often to make pizza dough.

But my LAST breadmaker? I lent it to my aunt when she was taking care of my invalid grandmother, who was soy-allergic, and used it several times a week to make bread. She wore that thing out; I used it twice after getting it back, and it flashed a ERROR sign and just gave up and died.


#14

I thought it was going to be dumb, but that 40 minute teardown video was BRILLIANT! Awesome commentary on this overbuilt albatross. There are some really yummy good parts in there. The machined aluminum chassis is amazing. It’s really a thing of beauty, like a solid gold toilet. The gears and bearings and hall sensors and transformers and wifi and and and… all the crap they threw at this thing… I am just shaking my head at how beautiful and absurd this piece of machinery is.

So this is how the world is turning out to be? When I was a kid, I dreamed of flying cars and all the rest… but instead, we get Keurigs and Juiceros. LOL, what a load of crap! Life is fucking bizarre, if nothing else.


#15

Sounds like engineering has come a long way since you were a kid.


#16

The horseless carriages are AMAZING! How in the what the? Powered by fire juice extracted from the deserts of Arabia? Mind=kaboom.


#17

I’m glad you enjoyed it.

It sounds like you should schedule some time with the Ave channel. His stuff is usually quite fun and interesting in this way. The BOLTR (Bored of Lame Tool Reviews) series are where he gives this precise treatment to various consumer and industrial products. In addition, he’s got lots of other similarly edutainmenty topics. I could do without the blue collar salty language theatrics (IMO he really turns it on for the channel), but otherwise love his stuff.


#18

Best museum ?

http://www.museumoffailure.se


#19

Depends if you have a use for real metal gears. Some of those would be pretty pricey if you ordered them new. Plus the base itself is hefty enough to be a usable source of aluminum for machining projects. I’m not sure I’d bother myself, but it would be gold for a high school robotics club.


#20

We had one, I used it 6 or 8 times before the motor burned out. Based on my own experience I’m surprised any working models make it to Goodwill. (Maybe they fix the motors?)