Lawyers helped daughter with tooth-fairy affidavit for lost tooth


#1

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#2

I’m not sure, but I don’t think lawyers can notarize their own clients’ signatures. Mine always sends me to someone else, for whatever reason.


#3

Everyone knows that the tooth fairy uses a sophisticated radar system to locate missing teeth. At least my daughter does. That is why occasionally she might forget to reimburse - that darn technology, it's never working when you need it to!


#4

Well, Mr. McWinters was acting in his capacity as a notary public, certifying the affidavit of the tooth being lost, not as a lawyer representing a client. Technically speaking he was also the legal guardian, so something of a grey area there. Probably need a ruling in Tooth Court to substantiate, but that's a lot of work for 25 cents.


#5

The good news is the child did get a shiny new dollar coin despite the missing tooth.

The bad news is her lawyers' contingency fee was 40%.


#6

I don't see his simultaneous status as a legal guardian as creating any problem or conflict.
Illinois notary regulations do prevent him from notarizing a document in which he's a party to the transaction.
However, Emily's affidavit explicitly states its purpose as inducing the tooth fairy to compensate Emily for her loss. Mr. Winters is in the clear, notarily-wise.


#7

Good, glad that's been settled satisfactorily. Sure, it may seem petty now, but those payment processors in Fairy World make the IRS look like kindergarteners counting on their fingers.


#8

What dollar coin would an American kid get in 1989? I guess the Loonie was out then, but that was only worth about 80 cents US at the time.


#9

Plenty of options, by 1989 there were Eisenhower dollars (stopped minting in 1978), Susan B Anthony Dollars (stopped minting in 1981) and American Silver Eagles (started in 1986, still minting today!), all with a $1 face value. I got a number of Susan B Anthony's myself as a kid in the 80s. That may well be the only thing they were used for. My amazing coin knowledge via Google and Wikipedia.


#10

Don't forget the Sacagawea ones!


#11

Sacagawea coins didn't start minting until 2000, so a 1989 kid wouldn't have had one without a time machine. In which case, seems a poor use of a time machine.


#12

http://www.northcountrypublicradio.org/news/npr/137394348/1-billion-that-nobody-wants


#13

Good point! I remember switching over from Susan B. coins to Sacagawea coins for my second child, but didn't remember why that was possible.


#14

Wow. I am not sure what to say beyond that (but I had to type more to make Discourse happy).


#15

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