Making, Crafting, Creating... aka Whatcha workin' on?

We’ve been back on the Sculpey. I pretty much exclusively work on aluminum foil armatures now and this project represents one of my more ambitious. The sword and sword arm in particular have a single-piece core built from a pounded flat aluminum blade and “bone”. She leaned over in the oven despite having an aluminum core base connect to leg stalks, so I ended up levelling her base with some foamy clay post-bake.

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That is wonderful!

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Made candy canes with the kids yesterday. If cooking candy doesn’t count as “making, crafting, etc.” then the hand-forged candy stretching hook that I mounted to the wall probably does.

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Are they traditional peppermint?

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Peppermint with a touch of unintentional molasses flavor, yes. (A result of us using unrefined sugar because that’s what we had in the house)

Edit to add: for anyone who wants to know how to do it I mostly went off the process seen in this video:

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Cool!
This is totally crafting.
Do you know about the Happy Mutants Food topic? Also a good fit there.

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Sweet!
I mean cool. Please post to the Happy Mutant food topic any foodie fun builds.

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We are redoing a bathroom that a previous housemate… fouled. As we were removing a toilet that had gone all trainspotty, I had an epiphany. A few moments of excited discussion later, and we are now working towards having a dedicated laboratory. (We may not be running an “actual” farm, but we still need to be able to do floats and cultures and suchlike.) I am unreasonably excited, and yes, I have a small Van de Graff generator.

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Swedish torch in action:

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Cubmaster & Commander

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If you’re lucky, then the log fallen nearby is slightly hollowed out white pine. Less work… also burns in the rain with a bit of an angle. I’m not sure if it’s better to carry a 1" auger and bit brace or a saw heavy enough to cut the log like a Swedish torch, assuming in this case that motorized equipment is verboten.

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For sure, I did not use ideal logs. These were hardwood (probably oak) and difficult to cut and drill. Hard to light, as well. There just aren’t many pine logs available in my area.

I did learn that the “pie” cuts are easier if you lay the log on its side and cut “down” from bark through the center, so you’re cutting parallel to the grain.

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One member of our family was having difficulty keeping his gingerbread house together but we found a very 2020 fix:

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A little something for all you motorcycle delivery swamp frog fans out there.

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Hand-forged cheese knife with cutting board made from a section of the neighbor’s fallen oak tree.

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Making gifts with the kid a few weeks ago. Wooden snowflakes, washable paint, then a few layers of gloss with glitter. Most are ornaments going in cards. I turned some into fridge decor.


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One of our horses very suddenly developed a taste for tree bark. This is not an ideal situation for the tree.

Yesterday I added two new sections of fencing to cordon off vulnerable trees. As soon as I finish breakfast, I’ll put on a few more layers and go get my Westinghouse on. I love our horses, but don’t fuck with a treehugger.

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Yeah, that tree’s dead, I’m afraid. Wonder if it’s a nutrient they’re looking for.

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She did that tree on Wednesday. Did another like it, but only about 70% the way around it, on Thursday. Friday morning after breakfast they stayed in their stalls until I was done driving T posts. My partner says the other one will probably live, whereas I just run around shouting “No!” until I get the new section of fence lit up like a chri— uhh, like a fully functioning equine deterrence array.

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If you have a few rolls of aluminum foil, and if you have these ingredients, I can vouch that this works, as long as the tree [bark] is not girdled 360°:

Wrap the trunk with one layer of aluminum foil after you’ve slathered it with the tree trunk goop.

Then wrap the trunk carefully in several layers of welded wire fence around the trunk to keep off the critters, and stake the fence so it doesn’t bang against the wounded, wrapped trunk.

Or cut the tree flush with the ground while it’s still got food and energy stored in its roots, and see if it’ll come back from the roots. Will still need to cage it (with stakes) until it gets higher than the equine browse line.

Agreed.

The eating of “free choice” plants by livestock often means something lacking in diet. Assuming there’s a mineral block in the paddock / corral, and they have hay or alfalfa (depending on the age of the animal, sometimes alfalfa is not great for older hooved stock), I’d be calling the vet to see what’s needed on their daily menu.

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