Man buried retirement cash, only to have it eaten by worms


#1

[Read the post]


#2

<img src="/uploads/default/original/3X/1/5/154ce265b642eb91430199f7d870d93aeae21dfe.jpg" width=“287” height=“176”


#3

Opting to stash cash
Not for a lack of interest
Feeding worms instead


#4

I’m pretty sure that my Aunt must have had a buried cache somewhere when she died… Perhaps whoever ended up with her mattress received a nice lump sum.


#5

“If money can’t buy happiness I guess I’ll have to rent it.”

–Weird Al Yankovic


#6

This is why you use a mason jar inside a sturdy chest, not a plastic grocery bag!


#7

Long-term storage knowledge can be fairly helpful in such cases.

Sometimes during renovations of a house or a shed, old WW2 spare parts are discovered. Sometimes in sturdy metal cans, immersed in oil or wrapped in corrosion suppressing agent soaked paper, or wrapped and then potted in asphalt, or so. Such parts are often in mint, as-new condition.


#8

A friend of mine stored a vintage automobile in that fashion, as an investment for his family’s future.


#9

That’s a big metal can.


#10

Cargo container, perhaps?


#11

That’s going to need a lot of oil to immerse it. Probably not the best for the tape deck either…


#12

Here I’d go for inert atmosphere. Pressurized dry nitrogen, perhaps, and monitor the pressure to detect leaks to swap the container in time when corrosion eats through.


#13

Shoulda used bitcoin.


#14

My God, @popobawa4u was right - it’s only so much paper!


#15

He shoulda shareld his tricks with those folks in Tulsa who buried the 1957 Plymouth Fury. When it was exhumed 50 years later, it was realized that a septic tank was probably not the best container to use. Heck, an inverted septic tank would have worked much better!


#16

Say what you will about the new testament and its fan club, the parable of the talents really is a powerful story just on its own.


#17

Haikus aren’t Chinese
“Interest”'s three syllables
Also threw you, eh?


#18

People could just remember the amount, and throw the paper out. Or not even print it in the first place. See? Just remembering the amount already saves money!


#19

Then you have to assure they remember the correct number. Human memory is bad as is, even without incentives to “misremember” the higher value.


#20

Incentives are for people who can’t make their own decisions!