Mother of twins put an FAQ on their stroller


#1

[Read the post]


#2

Laser-print, laminate, attach to stroller.
That’s what the laminating machines are for. :stuck_out_tongue:


#3

Is she sure that there wasn’t an identical set of “fraternal” twins at the hospital at the same time?


#4

an FAQ on their stroller

That “an” confused me for a hot second. Informal poll: who says “an eff-ay-cue” and who says “a fack?”


#5

And the kids can look forward to a lifetime of being asked what it’s like to be a twin when they have no experience of not being a twin to compare it to, not being treated as an individual, stupid questions about knowing what each other are thinking, constant direct comparisons in height, academic acheivement etc, being asked if they are identical to their sister…

An eff-ay-que.


#6

Fack, yes.


#7

I pronounce the first two letters as a syllable, and the last as a letter, so it’s Fah-que. Loudly. In public.


#8

In Boston?


#9

i’m all fack, all the time.


#10

don’t want me asking questions about your twins? then don’t make so much effort to show them off in public.


#11

F.A.Q., pronouncing each letter. Unless it’s “GameFacks”.


#12

Speaking as a twin who is also a parent of twins: that is complete and utter nonsense. Unless by “showing them off in public” you mean “going outside,” because that’s all it takes.

I had a lifetime to get used to all the twin commentary before my own kids came along so constantly getting the same questions and input doesn’t really bother me. But I get them A LOT, and I sure never put a sign reading “ask me about my children and/or reproductive choices!” on our stroller.

My kids are 5 years old now and the comments haven’t abated yet. I imagine this mother will just get used to them sooner or later.


#13

Since I generally use the plural (FAQs instead of FAQ), I say “the eff-eh-queues” because “facks” sounds too much like “facts.”


#14

My favourite was the ridiculously often asked (while standing there looking at my identical twin children, from birth into their teens): “Do they look alike?”

Eventually the wife and I learned to deadpan answer “No, not at all. I told you they’re identical.”


#15

well, making a big sign and posting it on the stroller is pretty silly, too. i think it would draw more attention than not having a sign in the first place.


#16

Maybe so, but avoiding the questions isn’t an option. The only choice is how to deal with them.

Like I said, they don’t bother me as much as they appear to bother her. (Except for the “did you do IVF/have them naturally or by cesarean section” ones. Call me old-fashioned, but I think it’s rude to ask perfect strangers questions relating to their genitals.)


#17

I pronounce it a tad different, a tad fun.


#18

Doubt I’ve ever pronounced it out loud, but in my mind it’s “fack.” I tend to do that with the easily-pronounceable ones, like NASA, leaving the spelling-out to the ones like NPR and FBI and FYI, that don’t have a sensibly-pronounced acronym. SOS is a notable exception, probably through decades of cultural habit.

I do spell out GTFO, though. I’ve never said “WTF” out loud, preferring to just emit a “What the fuck” under most circumstances, and a “Whiskey Tango Foxtrot” once or twice when I was feeling coy. And I refuse to emit an audible “LOL” under any circumstance.


#19

I agree, but since I live by a personal mandate to not be offended by anyone who isn’t actually trying to offend me, I’m happy to respond with a tolerant grin while saying, “Well, that’s none of your business, nosy!”

And then I see if they manage to get offended by me, in which case we’re probably even.


#20

i guess i just feel the sign and particularly the tone of the sign is pretty snotty, and begs for a snotty response. i definitely agree with you that asking how they were conceived is just jaw-droppingly rude. i would never ask such a thing!