Open carry swords come to Texas on Sept 1


#121

Sweet! Next time I go to Texas, I’m bringing one of mine…


#122

I read that argument a lot by USian gun “enthusiasts”: need guns because dangerous animals. Are wild animals in the USA really such a widespread problem and much more dangerous as those in Canada or Australia?


#123

At my brother’s town east of Kakadu, the feral/wild dog packs are bad enough that it’s suicidal to go outside without a weapon. They’re constantly present in large numbers, and are quite happy to stalk and attack people.

So he picks up a big stick before heading outside. Never owned a gun, never seen any reason to do so.

If he was a farmer with a herd or flock to protect, he’d likely have a bolt action .22 rifle. Which would be kept in the ute.


#124

Wait, what? Can’t believe that. No AR-15? No large caliber semi-automatic handgun? pump-action shotgun? Flamethrower? Your brother has the be an outlier - Crocodile Dundee junior or something …


#125

Schoolteacher, science and mathematics. :slight_smile:

He also regularly gets saltwater crocs in his backyard.


#126

#127

#128

Dr. Scholl sandals.

EDIT:
Dammit, I know that Alexei Sayle once did a bit about Dr. Scholl sandals in his TV show, but all I can find so far is his “Dr. Marten’s Boots” performance from The Young Ones.
Oh, well.


#129

Fake guns are no better than fake news.


#130

the downplaying of slavery as a social evil is relatively new in their textbooks (the last 5 or so years). Some background:

http://www.pbs.org/wnet/need-to-know/culture/texas-school-board-approves-controversial-textbook-changes/954/

http://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2015/07/13/421744763/how-textbooks-can-teach-different-versions-of-history


#131

I don’t know about incredibly dangerous, but we do get wild animals ending up in cities and suburbs. Where I am, I regularly see deer (which are dangerous to hit with your car) and coyotes (which are dangerous to small pets, if anything). And some snakes (we have 3 different poisonous snakes where I am, and rattlesnakes close to where we are).

But yeah, it’s a BS excuse, honestly, except in some really rural areas.


#132

Like where? I thought the wording regarding prohibitions on where a person may legally carry an edged weapon was now the same as for both open and concealed firearm carry. Mostly this law seems to just be getting rid of a lot of other (silly) laws regarding possessing or selling something that’s got a sharp edge. At least edged weapons require a some skill to use properly, and it’s much harder to murder fifty people in three minutes with them.


#133

Thing is, we rarely used them which is another thing, i remember taking one home once because i thought " we aren’t even using this, what’s in here" so much information went unused

One thing completely left out of the books is that it was also economic
Slavery could have been solved by the gov buying all the slaves into freedom the way England did
Although the support behind it would have been different here, it was still an idea that was not taken


#134

Neat.


#135

Texas showing they are truly medieval.


#136

Sure, but it also shapes how HS history teachers shape their classes, because the textbook also helps shapes the standards, and tests are what are taught to in many places.

You can’t extract one from the other, because the entire southern economy was built on slavery. The major objection was that the texas standards was keen to downplay the brutality of slavery and it’s centrality in the southern economy and as a major cause of the civil war itself.


#137

True true by all accounts


#138

Spoiler tag, please.


#139

Not in any state that I’ve ever seen - there’s still not equal treatment in Texas with this law. Texas allows open carry of guns in colleges and churches, for example, which will still apparently be prohibited for swords. In other states, what I’ve noticed is lots of laws specifically targeting various types of melee weapons, even in states with open carry laws (and since there aren’t conceal-carry permits for swords, they’re basically illegal to carry at all; some batons are simply outlawed entirely). It seems pretty common in the US that swords (and even batons) are far more restricted than guns.


#140

Texas does not allow open carry in colleges.

“Open carry is not permitted by a license holder regardless of whether the handgun is holstered:
on the premises of an institution of higher education or private or independent institution of higher education
on any public or private driveway, street, sidewalk or walkway, parking lot, parking garage or other parking area of an institution of higher education or private or independent institution of higher education”