Parents rent drug-sniffing dogs to search teens' bedrooms


#1

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#2

As implied by the article, you’ll note there is no mention of counseling, or professionals of any kind involved.
Not for the teens at risk of further abuse, nor for the walking adverts for eugenics they call parents.


#3

The thing we have told the kid is well yeah that shit will fuck up your body and he has looked up where it will on his own so has no real inclination to try (yet anyway as there is high school still to come).
The other thing we have said is since it is legal now if he gets some good weed he has to share with mom and dad.


#4

We want to take drugs off the streets

So you’re going after end-user kids?


#5

Can I just double-check that the dog on that billboard does, in fact, have a joint and an M80 shoved up its nose?


#6

Some twenty years ago, I recall hearing of a business that will send you a kit comprising some variety of wipe which you can rub on someone’s belongings and subsequently send back to be analyzed for traces of drugs. Said business is probably still around in some form or another.

his K9 teams have searched more than 50 homes and have a 90 percent hit rate

Previously:


#7

Talk about your authoritarian parenting complexes… Of course, by the time it gets to this point, the existing family dynamics will make it such that you can forget having the child ever being able to trust their genetic-donor/warden at all. This is just sealing the deal.


#8

I think this is an excellent idea. Angry dad beats the hell out of prison. Also, there’s no incentive for false positives, because angry dad doesn’t have a career to make. Also also, it puts responsibility squarely on parents, where it belongs, instead of throwing the children to the cops.

Trust is a much better solution. I completely trust my son not to bring anything dangerous home, and he wouldn’t smoke weed where his parents could smell it. I have a feeling lots of parents don’t have that.


#9

I don’t have a problem with this. Kids shouldn’t be doing drugs. Depending on what it is, it can cause permanent injury to the kid.

It opens the door for education and counseling.


#10

Why am I not surprised?

If you do have any kids, good luck trying to have a decent relationship with them when they become adults.


#11

could we call this “attack helicopter parenting”?


#12

I’m sure these cases end with big, teary, loving family hugs and the kids say nope to dope from then on.

It took me a bit to read that line as snark.

All the kids subjected to this kind of extreme treatment are likely to learn is something they’ve probably already come to understand: their parents wield a big, bad, dangerous stick, and that makes them an adversary.

“It’s them against me. All right then, so be it. I’ll just have to be more clever next time. Can’t WAIT until I can finally move out of this fucking dump.”


#13

I think it is important to discuss what could happen to them should they decide to abuse drugs. But renting a drug sniffing dog is a bit extreme, also totally pointless. Parents never seem to give their kids enough credit for being crafty. Any teen with overbearing parents knows how to be one step ahead.


#14

The bonus feature is that the dogs also serve as an untrustworthy parent detector for the teenagers.


#15

This begs for a double blind study with actors instead of real families.

Double blind so even the actors playing the parents don’t know if the dog will have anything to “hit” on.

I want to know the rate of false positives for this “service.”


#16

It’s animal cruelty to make these poor dogs sniff teenagers rooms.


#17

She’s such a rule follower, I don’t foresee this being an issue.

Let me elaborate. I don’t think this is something you go to first thing. Of the two, I am the cool parent, actually. This is a sort of last resort for someone who has either done it in the past, or there has been severe changes and other methods have not panned out. If your kid is constantly lying to you, getting into trouble, etc, this might be a necessary measure. Remember too it’s not just users, there are kids dealing in schools. I’d rather see the parents handle the situation vs the police.

Again, its a tool. You don’t have to be an overbearing parent to need to use it in some cases. But yes, I see your point an overbearing parent could abuse the service.


#18

Yes, just like a gun that way, amirite? All depends on how you use it, safety first, if anyone gets hurt then someone was just being irresponsible no reason to throw the bay out with the bathwater, there’s more chance of falling into a swimming pool then there is of a troubled kid reacting badly to hired dogs sniffing out his bedroom like he’s a suspected terrorist or something, etc etc.


#19

Sooo… what, just old fashioned rummage through their things? Or you just have a few talks and if that doesn’t do the trick, oh well. Kids will be kids.


#20

I think if one were to have a “problem child”, pulling a stunt like this isn’t going to make things better. It won’t be the “Scared Straight” moment the parents would be hoping for. If anything, that hate the child had for their parents is compounded.