Pedantic Digressions

No such thing. There’s Scottish/Scotch whisky, though.

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“Whiskey originally from Scotland” it is, then.
tophat-biggrin

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Here’s Scots tape:

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Whisky

Sorry, the thread is compelling me to follow this to the bitter end.

(It’s Irish and American whiskey but Scottish whisk_y)

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You’ve gone a little too far in your pedantry; both spellings are in the dictionary as acceptable speech.

Everything in moderation.

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I will admit that it is mostly made up bullshit but the whisky/whiskey dichotomy is something some drinks snobs are very particular about.

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I once dated a man whose drink of choice was 21 yr old Macallan; I know such pretentious types all too well.

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Or when I was younger you could tell it was smuggled because it was spelt whisky rather than the, normal, whiskey.

Obviously neither spelling is “authentic” as neither Irish nor Scots use y that way (it’s used in loanwords I believe). Or wh. Or the letter k.

No wait. Scots has a k apparently.

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Pass the Uisce Beatha would you?

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I guess the English spellings were probably enforced for marketing reasons? Seems likely anyway.

I have both that and uisge beatha over in the cupboard. Why should we limit ourselves?

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IMHO, a David Lean Dune would have (based on Lawrence of Arabia and A Passage to India) more smoothly, economically and effectively portrayed the book’s characters’ motivations and actions (and without all of Lynch’s infuriating voice-overs), things that, for me, provided the most interest in and enjoyment of the book.

Is “too far” a thing in this thread? That seems to be the game, push the minutia as far as you can, until you vanish into the quantum realm and emerge in another timeline!

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Surely you mean minutiae, since there are more than one of them. :wink:

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Indeed. :grinning_face_with_smiling_eyes:

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Here’s a thought: The phrase “I’ll bet dollars to donuts” is a relic from a bygone era when donuts cost significantly less than a dollar.

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Just to be insufferably pedantic, it should be “…to the tune of Country Roads by John Denver.”

John Denver is not a song. The song is Country Roads. Not to be confused with Randy Rhoads.

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Does being pedantic really mean you’re not allowed to understand metonymy? :confused:

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I think it’s synecdoche.

Remember, skirt is metonymy, tail is synecdoche.

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I guess so.

The phrase “to the tune of” is appropriate when it refers to a tune.

Would you say “My favorite novel is Dostoevsky”?