Photos of a beloved bull terrier posed in funny, imaginative scenes


#1

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#2

If decades of Jonathan Carroll have taught me anything it is this - “Bull Terriers are the best dogs”.

Still have never owned one (sucker for shelter mutts).


#3

There is bananas too.

Cory should just look at those bananas.


#4

Hah! I’m just rereading After Silence this week and read Land of Laughs the week before.


#5

I have those, Outside the Dog Museum and Sleeping in Flame on my reread every years rotation. Land of Laughs is also a test book - if I give it to someone and they truly enjoy it then compatibility between us is possible. Assuming they also like at least the first season of Twin Peaks (I am not a monster) and the recently added to the list vidja game Gone Home.

I kinda kept waiting for a bull terrier to show up in Cory’s book Someone Comes to Town, Someone Leaves Town - a book that was clearly written by someone with an admiration of Carroll. Probably too on the (blunt, wet, framed by a slash of a mouth) nose though.


#6

I should add that our dogs (and cats) have always been rescue animals, as with yours.

Everyone thinks our current dog Maggie may have some bull terrier in her, given her sweet but stubborn personality and her mighty jaws. First time we had to leave her alone in the house for a bit, we closed her in the bathroom. When we got home, we found she had gotten anxious and chewed a large hunk out of the wooden door frame. She was doing pretty well at chewing the metal bars out of her “crate” too, until we figured out how to reinforce it so that she couldn’t get her teeth around them. Eventually we hope she’ll start feeling secure enough that she’ll stop chewing stuff up whenever left alone, and we won’t need to keep caging her.


#7

I cant help my self, but murdering machine with added googly eyes stays murdering machine. Not cute. Not funny.


#8

I know I shouldn’t feed the energy creature, and I may regret this, but:
A bull terrier, or a so-called “pit bull”, or any other type of dog, taken as a representative of its class, is no more a murdering machine than you are, perhaps less so. Vicious dogs have usually become vicious as the result of persistent abuse and neglect - just as people do - with a very very few individuals who may have inborn tendencies to aggression - just as people do. Human beings kill and harm enough of each other every year to dwarf the number of dog attacks, yet I’m willing to give most people the benefit of the doubt. It seems only fair to extend the same to dogs, regardless of breed.

There are always people with a nasty streak who are drawn by the idea of having an aggressive vicious dog, and they’ll seek out whatever breed of dog the media is currently telling them is aggressive and vicious and will treat their dogs in ways that bring out that behavior. (See for example the asshole up our street who’s named his dog ‘Monster’.) The last couple decades, that breed has been “pit bull”, and they’ve been overrepresented in serious dog attacks. Before that,during the '60s and '70s, the breeds romanticized as aggressive were Rottweilers and German Shepherds, and those breeds accounted for a much larger fraction of serious dog attacks.


#9

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