Prefilled Communion Cups with Wafers - Box of 500


#1

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#2

Clearly, this is for non-Catholics (and non-Episcopalians, too), as it’s grape juice as opposed to wine…


#3

They’re remarkably handy for (Protestant) church services in locations where doing Communion in the usual way would be difficult. The interdenominational service at Gen Con has used them the last couple of years.


#4

Times are tough, there’s a War on.


#5

This makes no sense. The communion turns the wafer magically into a tasty piece of gluten free Jesus.


#6

Well, there goes my plan of buying a box and finding out how many tiny cups it takes to get completely fecking leathered.


#7

The website might have communion wine, I didn’t really check.

And as far as I know, Catholics can only have communion once a day… I think you’ll have to break into a church and drink it down between services!


#8

We’ve seen this before.

Not literally “pretransubstantiated”, I would think. Though that does bring to mind the colorful image of an Industrial Bulk Transubstantiator.


#9

That, and gluten-free wafers are not considered appropriate for Communion.


#10

Pretransubstantiated

I have a new favorite word :sunny:


#11

Actually, I do wonder what Catholics with gluten allergies or who are alcoholic do about communion? Though, I’d guess a single wafer a week (or two at the most, probably - or even one a day, if you go to church daily) wouldn’t kill someone with gluten issues. But what about people who are alcoholics? I mean, not that you’re going to get drunk on a single drink, but you know…


#12

I went to a Prep-Seminary High School where most of the teachers were Catholic Priests. I was told that priests that were alcoholics could get a dispensation from their bishop to use grape juice for the ceremony. When communion is given out to the congregation additional chalices of wine are used that were on the altar and consecrated but the chalice the priest sips from can be grape juice.

I do not know about gluten free hosts. It is my understanding the host has to be unleavened wheat bread. There is a thing about the elements of a sacrament. Water needs to be used for baptism, not apple juice. Preferably clean, pure running water but not necessarily so. Chrism oil for last rights. Wheat bread for Eucharist.


#13

I though only priests get to drink wine in the catholic church?

All protestant churches I know have the rule that anyone not willing to drink wine can simply pass the goblet.


#14

From The Code of Canon Law:

Can. 917 A person who has already received the Most Holy Eucharist can receive it a second time on the same day only within the eucharistic celebration in which the person participates, without prejudice to the prescript of ⇒ can. 921

Here’s a little more information about how to parse that:

The key here is that the second time must be during a Mass, and you may not enter the Mass at some late point merely in order to receive.


#15

Hardly. At the Last Supper Jesus wasn’t being metaphorical, He was literally telling His followers that He is made of bread. Jesus is Gluten. Gluten intolerance is intolerance to Jesus. Clearly celiac is the work of Satan. :disappointed:


#16

Damnit! I was so looking forward to a tiny wine and crackers party.


#17

Indeed.

And saying ‘pretransubstantiated’ for a clearly protestant product is a bit like those catalogue pictures of Android phones running iOS.

#churchgeek


#18

Nothing wrong with passing on the wine or, for that matter, the host itself. If you had a gluten allergy that was affected by the small amount of stuff, you could just take the wine, or ask that you receive a very, very small piece of the host.


#19

Also, you would never take communion twice in one day unless you are actually the celebrant of the Mass. (Unless you are at immediate risk of death – in which case a priest would always offer communion).


#20

Blasphemy!