Scientists discover second octopus city, population 15


#1

Originally published at: https://boingboing.net/2017/09/25/scientists-discover-second-oct.html


#2

Gathering together, getting ready for the takeover. Planet of the octopuses…


#3

I, for one, salute our new cephalopod overlords.


#4

Let’s see…

Very crowded environment,

The OctoCity attracts a lot of negative attention from other creatures,

The area they inhabit is covered with debris,

The males “spent a lot of time chasing each other around”,

…Holy hell, octopuses have discovered meth labs!


#5

15 beings is a city?


#6

So it begins


#7

With tourists and gentrification, life in Octopuscity has become unbearable.


#8

These scientists should come check out the Midwest. The metropolitan gigaplexes created by prairie dogs would blow their minds.


#9

Don’t forget the hipsters. Octopi wearing fedoras, random fish-hook piercings, etc.


#10

You only need a post office, a business and one person to incorporate a city, right?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monowi,_Nebraska


#11

Think where we’d be now if the giant, prehistoric cephalopods had not gone extinct.


#12

I know you can be a country. Sealand started out as two people, a father and daughter I think.

I always figured something that small was a town. But who knows, maybe the octopi voted in favor of calling itself a city by a show of tentacles.
I’m laughing to myself because I picture maybe one of the octopi trying to fake the group out by raising an additional tentacle behind his shoulder.


#13

They have a Starbucks.


#14

There is a sucker born every day.


#15

Should have been called “Octopus’s Garden” Already has a song.


#16

Eight lattes to go, please


#17

My impression is that “smart” animals are always social animals. The link being that social interaction requires a level of cognitive ability that being solitary or just pair-bound does not, because they have to mentally model how other members of the group perceive each other in order to be effective at group interactions. Then that cognitive ability is flexible enough that it can be used for other things like solving puzzles, etc. So I’ve long thought that it was weird that octopuses were supposed to be solitary.

Are there any other supposedly solitary animals that are considered “smart?”


#18

For octopuses, it is. But nobody goes there any more. It’s too crowded.


#19


#20

I wouldn’t worry too much…

Group Hug Debacle