Sex worker arrested in Google exec's heroin death on yacht

Am I the only one who finds this practice of publishing names of people who have been arrested but not convicted of any crime appalling?

11 Likes

Not every story has to have a good guy. Sometimes it’s all just different kinds of assholes.

This woman left a dying person to his fate. She could have called 911, but she decided covering her own ass was more important. There is no world in which that’s an okay thing to do. I understand she was scared, and rightfully so. I understand she was between a rock and a hard place. But it was a hard place she put herself in when she sold a dude heroin and helped him shoot up.

She could have tried to help him. She would certainly have gotten in a pile of trouble, but not as much as she’s in now. She choose to roll the dice, double-or-nothing, and she lost. I can despise the system that led to the choices she made, the system that will certainly not give her any decent chance at rehabilitation; but I can’t say that she’s an innocent victim.

3 Likes

No, you’re not alone. Trial by media is unfair to all concerned.

1 Like

Archer on hooker etiquette

2 Likes

Give it a rest already. This isn’t a story about gentrification. Your attempts to turn the conversation toward that unrelated topic demonstrate that you have an agenda and that you care about little else. Everything else you might have to say – valid or not – is rendered suspect by your clumsy attempt to make this something that it isn’t.

10 Likes

"lured her back to Santa Cruz County in a prostitution sting at a lavish hotel, "

Dude. I lived in Santa Cruz. There ain’t no hotel I’d describe as “lavish” there.

3 Likes

This is another reason that intranasal naloxone (aka narcan) should be widely distributed to all who use opiod drugs - including the real killers sold by big pharma. All good junkies should have some on them - but as it stands, you need a script to get this lifesaving drug.

3 Likes

To me, what came to mind was that if this had been a woman OD’ing after being injected by a sex partner, she’d be held responsible for her own fate. You know, what did she expect, that’s what happens, etc.

3 Likes

The root of the story is that one human died in the presence of another. Most of the rest is classic media elevation and arrangement of irrelevant and/or salacious “facts” to make points about - and thus maintain, if not reinvigorate - stereotypes for shock value.

2 Likes

There’s a point I’ve been quite curious about in all of this: is there any reason to believe she had any idea he was overdosing? It seems entirely likely that she just decided to let him sleep off his trip.

2 Likes

Why should the responsibility of controlling overdoses be the responsibility of sex workers? It’s just another opportunity to blame sex workers for the (fatal) choices Johns make.

2 Likes

That’s a possibility, but this story mentioned in the post says that in 2013 she had called 911 to report that someone she knew had overdosed, so she wasn’t ignorant of the danger. I don’t know if there are any ways to guesstimate how “serious” a person’s reaction is when they’re blacked out on heroin, if there are and she did some kind of cursory check and thought he’d be OK, that will probably come out in the trial. But if she just had no idea whether he would live or die, that does seem pretty sociopathic.

I didn’t say that, exactly. I put forward the idea that it was at least partly the responsibility of the john to have a paramedic at his drug/sex party. If these activities were legal, or moved into more of a decriminalized gray area, simple standards of responsible behavior could develop. As it is, we can’t even get a public consensus on needle exchange and rights for sex workers.

2 Likes

Well, I certainly don’t think that it’s cool to leave someone who’s overdosing without at least taking a stab at trying to get them some help. And the quote of “Waiting for the Man” kind of squicks me out.

But… she may have fled because she knew that she’d basically get blamed for her trick’s heroin use, which seems to be exactly what happened here; she’s being scapegoated for his appetite for drugs and hookers and being involved, however tangentially, in an embarrassing demise. In fact, it reminds me quite a lot of Cathy Smith going to jail for helping John Belushi shoot up his fatal speedball.

3 Likes

The yacht is now for sale for $345,000. Understandable that the widow doesn’t want to keep it.

1 Like

If you’re going to shoot someone up with a potentially lethal drug, you need to be aware of the possible consequences and how to deal with them. Her sex worker status doesn’t enter into that, or at least shouldn’t.

2 Likes

The damage this man does on a daily basis outweighs her mistake. He has no shame about that. He finishes his wine after he inflates the cost of housing and food.

Very Swiftian. I see what you’re doing.

Asked if Tichelman was trying to kill Hayes or if the overdose was accidental, Clark said the evidence showed a level of guilt that reached second-degree murder rather than involuntary manslaughter.

I think what they’re going for is “depraved indifference.” they’re not going to argue she’s a serial killer or that she gave him a hot shot, but by not calling an ambulance or attempting to render first aid at all, it goes beyond manslaughter.

We’re supposed to feed ourselves on hookers?

That’s strange. I could have sworn victim-blaming wasn’t ok on Boing Boing. I guess he was just asking to be injected with a fatal dose of heroin. Don’t teach heroin users to be safe, teach drug dealers not to kill.

1 Like