This bonobo's big grin is infectious


#1

[Read the post]


#2

If I had as much sex as bonobos do I’d have an infectious grin too.


#3

Why don’t you? If it is equally true for others of your kind, then you are inconveniencing yourselves unnecessarily.


#4

Infectious smile, huh?

Sounds deadly: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kuru_(disease)


#5

Hopefully not when you’re a toddler like this one clearly is. Most chimps & bonobos we’ve ever seen outside of a nature film or zoo are pre-adolescent. Adults are less cute and way more dangerous, as that lady who had her face removed by a “pet” found out.


#6

Why not? If anything, it seems like a great demonstration that kids enjoy sex as much as anyone else does. Letting them enjoy what they wanted to do anyway harms them less than making them stop until some magical “later” time when it’s convenient for others.

The only way people will rationalize why they imagine it harms human children is to refuse to discuss it. So why doesn’t it harm other apes? (cricket noise) One of my methodologies for questioning thing is to ask “Is it supposedly unique to humans?”, and this is a perfect example.


#7

giggle


#8

Bonobos are rather different from the kinds of chimpanzees that become so violent as they grow older. The “pet” you mentioned, I’m almost certain, was not a Bonobo.


#9

This topic was automatically closed after 5 days. New replies are no longer allowed.