Turkey requires pet owners to undergo mandatory certification


#1

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#2

This must make things difficult for python enthusiasts.

Q: "You're sure you're well qualified to take care of that mouse?"
A: "Oh yes. Absolutely."
Q: "I'm only asking because this is the third one you've bought here this month. How are the others settling in?"
A: "Oh, FANTASTIC. Yes. In fact they love their home so much they want more friends to share it with."


#3

Is it wrong that I like this pic of a dog freaked out by sidelong eyes drawn on a paper tube than any news or commentary I have seen on the 'net today.


#4

There should be similar requirements for having a baby.


#5

I wonder why there's an exception for birds? Especially since parrots are one of the most intelligent, long lived, and incredibly poorly treated "pets" around.


#6

It would be nice if we had something here. Too many dogs and cats are killed every year because we can't find homes for them. Unspayed and unneutered dogs and cats should require a special license to possess.


#7

I can't decide whether this is a piece of prize cognitive dissonance, or a sign that your opponents are always human.

The present Turkish government are a bunch of censorious thugs, who trample on political rights, kill protesters and journalists, escalate the civil war in Syria for their own ends and continue to cover up genocide.

But they also don't like animal cruelty.


#8

I love almost everything about this- I'm sure there are more than enough dogs and cats in shelters without pet stores selling them. Here in the USA, most pet stores have stopped selling dogs and cats anyway and instead host events where a bunch of animals from the local Humane Society are shown off for adoption. However, I do wonder why they chose fish and birds. What if someone wants a pet tarantula, or rabbit, or ferret? Maybe they just haven't gotten around to making the certification programs for other animals yet, and will allow them in time?


#9

The current Turkish government is made up of a lot more departments and people than you're imagining.


#10

It turns out it's not actually necessary to feed snakes on live rodents. You can buy humanely-killed, flash-frozen mice and rats of various sizes in bulk and thaw them in hot water when it's feeding time. More efficient, more humane, and less work for the snake.


#11

What would help the unwanted pet problem is if pet owners were legally responsible for any pets they acquire for the rest of the pet's life. Kind of like children, which I've found are pretty difficult to get rid of.


#12

If it is wrong, then I don't want to be right...


#13

Wouldn't requiring certification decrease the number of available homes for pets (and hence increase the number of cats and dogs killed), not increase the number of available homes?


#14

Less work for the snake? I don't think predation is work for predators.


#15

The responses here are amazing in their level of cognitive dissonance. If you allow a government to require a permit and proof of passing some dimwitted class to own a dog then it is not a stretch to understand how that same government can control what you say or read.

In addition those wanting to require a permit to have children are either kidding (probably only slightly if at all) or are completely unaware of the eugenics movement in the US at the turn of the 20th century. Over a period of 30 years over 50,000 people were forcibly sterilized.

Regards,


#16

The dog is Soybean, he belongs to the amazing artist Esao Andrews (http://esao.net/). The photograph was taken by Thomas Prior, (http://thomasprior.com/).


#17

In Istanbul, there are stray cats everywhere. I tried to find an original source, but I keep seeing numbers well above 100,000. So, I think there's probably more to the story.

After doing some reading, I think it may specifically be intended to slow the number of pure bred dogs getting imported and abandoned.... It's better than another recent attempt which apparently was to ship stray dogs outside the city, and leave them there.


#18

I'm glad I didn't have to scroll past the third post to see someone point out the elephant here.

The deal-breaking problem here is merely the same deal-breaking problem with 'representative' democracy - elites defying science and community values. If we ever get our shit properly together, the concept of eugenics will one day be well and truly rehabilitated.

It'll probably need a different name though, if that day arrives within the next century or so...


#19

That was along my first thoughts... Makes a good excuse to go door to door checking to see if you are certified to own that pet.


#20

So, in which way is that fundamentally different than having to pass a class to drive a vehicle on public roads?